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dc.contributor.authorNewton, Katherine M.
dc.contributor.authorBuist, Diana S. M.
dc.contributor.authorYu, Onchee
dc.contributor.authorHartsfield, Cynthia L.
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Susan E.
dc.contributor.authorWei, Feifei
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Maureen T.
dc.contributor.authorChan, K. Arnold
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:28:31Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:28:31Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-12
dc.date.submitted2011-12-30
dc.identifier.citationMenopause. 2008 May-Jun;15(3):487-93. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/gme.0b013e318154b9a5">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1072-3714 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/gme.0b013e318154b9a5
dc.identifier.pmid18188140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37037
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe hormone therapy (HT) initiation after the 2002 publication of the Women's Health Initiative. DESIGN: Observational cohort (1999-2003) of women ages 40 to 79 years, five health plans, used HT in July 2002 and subsequently discontinued or never used before August 2002. RESULTS: Of discontinuers, 15.8% (3,203 of 20,205) reinitiated HT. Reinitiation was higher among estrogen users (23.8%) versus estrogen with progestin users (11.3%), and lower among those with diabetes (relative risk [RR]=0.68, 95% CI: 0.61-0.76), cardiovascular disease (RR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.83-0.92), and hyperlipidemia (RR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.79-0.88). Only 2.3% (2,072 of 90,261) of never users initiated (August 2002 to December 2003). First-time initiation was associated with cardiovascular disease (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.10-1.25) and hyperlipidemia (RR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.17-1.33) and was less common among those with diabetes (RR=0.70, 95% CI: 0.63-0.79). CONCLUSIONS: After the Women's Health Initiative, a minority of women reinitiated or became first-time initiators of HT. Women with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia were less likely to reinitiate; women with cardiovascular disease and hyperlipidemia were more likely to be first-time initiators.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=18188140&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/gme.0b013e318154b9a5
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectDrug Administration Routes
dc.subjectDrug Administration Schedule
dc.subjectEstrogen Replacement Therapy
dc.subjectEstrogens
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Maintenance Organizations
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Patient Acceptance of Health Care
dc.subjectProgestins
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleHormone therapy initiation after the Women's Health Initiative
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMenopause (New York, N.Y.)
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/423
dc.identifier.contextkey2426079
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: To describe hormone therapy (HT) initiation after the 2002 publication of the Women's Health Initiative.</p> <p>DESIGN: Observational cohort (1999-2003) of women ages 40 to 79 years, five health plans, used HT in July 2002 and subsequently discontinued or never used before August 2002.</p> <p>RESULTS: Of discontinuers, 15.8% (3,203 of 20,205) reinitiated HT. Reinitiation was higher among estrogen users (23.8%) versus estrogen with progestin users (11.3%), and lower among those with diabetes (relative risk [RR]=0.68, 95% CI: 0.61-0.76), cardiovascular disease (RR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.83-0.92), and hyperlipidemia (RR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.79-0.88). Only 2.3% (2,072 of 90,261) of never users initiated (August 2002 to December 2003). First-time initiation was associated with cardiovascular disease (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.10-1.25) and hyperlipidemia (RR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.17-1.33) and was less common among those with diabetes (RR=0.70, 95% CI: 0.63-0.79).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: After the Women's Health Initiative, a minority of women reinitiated or became first-time initiators of HT. Women with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia were less likely to reinitiate; women with cardiovascular disease and hyperlipidemia were more likely to be first-time initiators.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/423
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.source.pages487-93


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