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dc.contributor.authorSabin, James E.
dc.contributor.authorMazor, Kathleen M.
dc.contributor.authorMeterko, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorGoff, Sarah L.
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, Richard
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:28:37Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:28:37Z
dc.date.issued2008-10-25
dc.date.submitted2011-12-30
dc.identifier.citationHastings Cent Rep. 2008 Sep-Oct;38(5):39-48. <a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/25165369">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn0093-0334 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid18947140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37057
dc.description.abstract"Cluster randomized trials," in which groups of patients are randomly assigned to different therapeutic interventions, provide a powerful way of evaluating drugs. CRTs have not been widely used, in good part because of concerns about whether patients must give informed consent to participate in them. A better understanding of how CRTs fit into clinical practice resolves the concerns.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=18947140&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/25165369
dc.subject*Cluster Analysis
dc.subjectData Collection
dc.subjectHealth Facility Administrators
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInformed Consent
dc.subjectPatient Satisfaction
dc.subjectRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleComparing drug effectiveness at health plans: the ethics of cluster randomized trials
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Hastings Center report
dc.source.volume38
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/441
dc.identifier.contextkey2426097
html.description.abstract<p>"Cluster randomized trials," in which groups of patients are randomly assigned to different therapeutic interventions, provide a powerful way of evaluating drugs. CRTs have not been widely used, in good part because of concerns about whether patients must give informed consent to participate in them. A better understanding of how CRTs fit into clinical practice resolves the concerns.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/441
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.source.pages39-48


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