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dc.contributor.authorMazor, Kathleen M.
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Katherine S.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:23.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:28:40Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:28:40Z
dc.date.issued2009-09-16
dc.date.submitted2011-12-30
dc.identifier.citationAm J Med Qual. 2009 Sep-Oct;24(5):412-8. Epub 2009 Jun 12. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1062860609335971">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1062-8606 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1062860609335971
dc.identifier.pmid19525369
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37070
dc.description.abstractRecent interest in publicly reporting health care-associated infections (HAIs) makes it important to develop reports that consumers can understand and evaluate. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 59 consumers. Interviews focused on responses to existing and prototypical reports and on recommendations for improvements. Many interviewees were unfamiliar with HAIs and were distressed to learn HAIs occur and can result in death. Public reporting was seen as unlikely to affect hospital choice; other factors were considered more influential. Interviewees recommended that reports be brief and include information on prevention as well as performance data. Additional recommendations on format and content were identified. For public reporting of HAIs to be successful, attention to report content and format are necessary. Consumer involvement can help to identify potential sources of confusion and methods of improving reporting.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19525369&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1062860609335971
dc.subjectAccess to Information
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subject*Attitude to Health
dc.subjectCross Infection
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHospitals
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInterviews as Topic
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Risk Management
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleA qualitative study of consumers' views on public reporting of health care-associated infections
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of medical quality : the official journal of the American College of Medical Quality
dc.source.volume24
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/453
dc.identifier.contextkey2426109
html.description.abstract<p>Recent interest in publicly reporting health care-associated infections (HAIs) makes it important to develop reports that consumers can understand and evaluate. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 59 consumers. Interviews focused on responses to existing and prototypical reports and on recommendations for improvements. Many interviewees were unfamiliar with HAIs and were distressed to learn HAIs occur and can result in death. Public reporting was seen as unlikely to affect hospital choice; other factors were considered more influential. Interviewees recommended that reports be brief and include information on prevention as well as performance data. Additional recommendations on format and content were identified. For public reporting of HAIs to be successful, attention to report content and format are necessary. Consumer involvement can help to identify potential sources of confusion and methods of improving reporting.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/453
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.source.pages412-8


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