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dc.contributor.authorGross, Alden L.
dc.contributor.authorParsi, Jeanine M.
dc.contributor.authorSpira, Adam P.
dc.contributor.authorKueider, Alexandra M.
dc.contributor.authorKo, Jean Y.
dc.contributor.authorSaczynski, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorSamus, Quincy M.
dc.contributor.authorRebok, George W.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:23.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:29:04Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:29:04Z
dc.date.issued2012-03-16
dc.date.submitted2012-08-09
dc.identifier.citation<p>Aging Ment Health. 2012 Mar 16. DOI:10.1080/13607863.2012.667783 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2012.667783" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1360-7863 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13607863.2012.667783
dc.identifier.pmid22423647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37161
dc.description.abstractA systematic review and meta-analysis of memory training research was conducted to characterize the effect of memory strategies on memory performance among cognitively intact, community-dwelling older adults, and to identify characteristics of individuals and of programs associated with improved memory. The review identified 402 publications, of which 35 studies met criteria for inclusion. The overall effect size estimate, representing the mean standardized difference in pre-post change between memory-trained and control groups, was 0.31 standard deviations (SD; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.39). The pre-post training effect for memory-trained interventions was 0.43 SD (95% CI: 0.29, 0.57) and the practice effect for control groups was 0.06 SD (95% CI: -0.05, 0.16). Among 10 distinct memory strategies identified in studies, meta-analytic methods revealed that training multiple strategies was associated with larger training gains (p = 0.04), although this association did not reach statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Treatment gains among memory-trained individuals were not better after training in any particular strategy, or by the average age of participants, session length, or type of control condition. These findings can inform the design of future memory training programs for older adults.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=22423647&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2012.667783
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectGeriatrics
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPrimary Care
dc.titleMemory training interventions for older adults: A meta-analysis
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAging and mental health
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/543
dc.identifier.contextkey3194123
html.description.abstract<p>A systematic review and meta-analysis of memory training research was conducted to characterize the effect of memory strategies on memory performance among cognitively intact, community-dwelling older adults, and to identify characteristics of individuals and of programs associated with improved memory. The review identified 402 publications, of which 35 studies met criteria for inclusion. The overall effect size estimate, representing the mean standardized difference in pre-post change between memory-trained and control groups, was 0.31 standard deviations (SD; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.39). The pre-post training effect for memory-trained interventions was 0.43 SD (95% CI: 0.29, 0.57) and the practice effect for control groups was 0.06 SD (95% CI: -0.05, 0.16). Among 10 distinct memory strategies identified in studies, meta-analytic methods revealed that training multiple strategies was associated with larger training gains (p = 0.04), although this association did not reach statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Treatment gains among memory-trained individuals were not better after training in any particular strategy, or by the average age of participants, session length, or type of control condition. These findings can inform the design of future memory training programs for older adults.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/543
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine


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