Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Eric S.
dc.contributor.authorBartman, Barbara A.
dc.contributor.authorBriesacher, Becky A.
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Neil S.
dc.contributor.authorGerhard, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorKornegay, Cynthia J.
dc.contributor.authorNourjah, Parivash
dc.contributor.authorSauer, Brian
dc.contributor.authorSchumock, Glen
dc.contributor.authorSedrakyan, Art
dc.contributor.authorSturmer, Til
dc.contributor.authorWest, Suzanne L.
dc.contributor.authorSchneeweiss, Sebastian
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:23.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:29:11Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:29:11Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-01
dc.date.submitted2013-01-02
dc.identifier.citation<p>Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jan;22(1):1-6. doi: 10.1002/pds.3334. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pds.3334" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1053-8569 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pds.3334
dc.identifier.pmid23023988
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37188
dc.description.abstractComparative effectiveness research includes cohort studies and registries of interventions. When investigators design such studies, how important is it to follow patients from the day they initiated treatment with the study interventions? Our article considers this question and related issues to start a dialogue on the value of the incident user design in comparative effectiveness research. By incident user design, we mean a study that sets the cohort's inception date according to patients' new use of an intervention. In contrast, most epidemiologic studies enroll patients who were currently or recently using an intervention when follow-up began. We take the incident user design as a reasonable default strategy because it reduces biases that can impact non-randomized studies, especially when investigators use healthcare databases. We review case studies where investigators have explored the consequences of designing a cohort study by restricting to incident users, but most of the discussion has been informed by expert opinion, not by systematic evidence.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=23023988&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pds.3334/pdf
dc.rights<p>This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. </p>
dc.subjectComparative Effectiveness Research
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleThe incident user design in comparative effectiveness research
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePharmacoepidemiology and drug safety
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1897&amp;context=meyers_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/599
dc.identifier.contextkey3560202
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:29:11Z
html.description.abstract<p>Comparative effectiveness research includes cohort studies and registries of interventions. When investigators design such studies, how important is it to follow patients from the day they initiated treatment with the study interventions? Our article considers this question and related issues to start a dialogue on the value of the incident user design in comparative effectiveness research. By incident user design, we mean a study that sets the cohort's inception date according to patients' new use of an intervention. In contrast, most epidemiologic studies enroll patients who were currently or recently using an intervention when follow-up began. We take the incident user design as a reasonable default strategy because it reduces biases that can impact non-randomized studies, especially when investigators use healthcare databases. We review case studies where investigators have explored the consequences of designing a cohort study by restricting to incident users, but most of the discussion has been informed by expert opinion, not by systematic evidence.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/599
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.source.pages1-6


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
pds3334.pdf
Size:
96.58Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record