Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBriesacher, Becky A.
dc.contributor.authorTjia, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorField, Terry S.
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorGurwitz, Jerry H.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:29:21Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:29:21Z
dc.date.issued2013-02-06
dc.date.submitted2013-05-17
dc.identifier.citation<p>JAMA. 2013 Feb 6;309(5):440-2. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.211266. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2012.211266" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.2012.211266
dc.identifier.pmid23385262
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37225
dc.description.abstractThe prescribing of antipsychotic medications persists at high levels in US nursing homes (NHs) despite extensive data demonstrating marginal clinical benefits and serious adverse effects, including death.1- 2 However, imprecise and outdated data have limited the understanding of the current state of antipsychotic medication prescribing in NHs.3 We analyzed recent and detailed NH prescription data to address: (1) What is the current level of antipsychotic use? (2) Does antipsychotic use in NHs display geographic variation? and (3) Which antipsychotics are most commonly prescribed?
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=23385262&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2012.211266
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAntipsychotic Agents
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNursing Homes
dc.subjectOff-Label Use
dc.subjectPharmacies
dc.subjectPhysician's Practice Patterns
dc.subjectPrevalence
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectGeriatrics
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectPharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.titleAntipsychotic use among nursing home residents
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association
dc.source.volume309
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/642
dc.identifier.contextkey4151958
html.description.abstract<p>The prescribing of antipsychotic medications persists at high levels in US nursing homes (NHs) despite extensive data demonstrating marginal clinical benefits and serious adverse effects, including death.<a href="http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1568246#ref-jld120033-1">1</a>- <a href="http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1568246#ref-jld120033-1">2</a> However, imprecise and outdated data have limited the understanding of the current state of antipsychotic medication prescribing in NHs.<a href="http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1568246#ref-jld120033-3">3</a> We analyzed recent and detailed NH prescription data to address: (1) What is the current level of antipsychotic use? (2) Does antipsychotic use in NHs display geographic variation? and (3) Which antipsychotics are most commonly prescribed?</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/642
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.source.pages440-2


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record