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dc.contributor.authorGill, Sudeep S.
dc.contributor.authorRochon, Paula A.
dc.contributor.authorHerrmann, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorLee, Philip E.
dc.contributor.authorSykora, Kathy
dc.contributor.authorGunraj, Nadia
dc.contributor.authorNormand, Sharon-Lise T.
dc.contributor.authorGurwitz, Jerry H.
dc.contributor.authorMarras, Connie
dc.contributor.authorWodchis, Walter P.
dc.contributor.authorMamdani, Muhammad M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:29:26Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:29:26Z
dc.date.issued2005-02-26
dc.date.submitted2009-09-25
dc.identifier.citationBMJ. 2005 Feb 26;330(7489):445. Epub 2005 Jan 24. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38330.470486.8F">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1468-5833
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.38330.470486.8F
dc.identifier.pmid15668211
dc.identifier.pmid15668211
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37244
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of admissions to hospital for stroke among older adults with dementia receiving atypical or typical antipsychotics. DESIGN: Population based retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. Patients 32,710 older adults (< or = 65 years) with dementia (17,845 dispensed an atypical antipsychotic and 14,865 dispensed a typical antipsychotic). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Admission to hospital with the most responsible diagnosis (single most important condition responsible for the patient's admission) of ischaemic stroke. Observation of patients until they were either admitted to hospital with ischaemic stroke, stopped taking antipsychotics, died, or the study ended. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, participants receiving atypical antipsychotics showed no significant increase in risk of ischaemic stroke compared with those receiving typical antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.26). This finding was consistent in a series of subgroup analyses, including ones of individual atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) and selected subpopulations of the main cohorts. CONCLUSION: Older adults with dementia who take atypical antipsychotics have a similar risk of ischaemic stroke to those taking typical antipsychotics.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBritish Medical Association
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15668211&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAntipsychotic Agents
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectDementia
dc.subjectHospitalization
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIncidence
dc.subjectOntario
dc.subjectRetrospective Studies
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subjectStroke
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleAtypical antipsychotic drugs and risk of ischaemic stroke: population based retrospective cohort study.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBMJ (Clinical research ed.)
dc.source.volume330
dc.source.issue7489
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1079&amp;context=meyers_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/meyers_pp/66
dc.identifier.contextkey1017160
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:29:26Z
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of admissions to hospital for stroke among older adults with dementia receiving atypical or typical antipsychotics. DESIGN: Population based retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. Patients 32,710 older adults (< or = 65 years) with dementia (17,845 dispensed an atypical antipsychotic and 14,865 dispensed a typical antipsychotic). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Admission to hospital with the most responsible diagnosis (single most important condition responsible for the patient's admission) of ischaemic stroke. Observation of patients until they were either admitted to hospital with ischaemic stroke, stopped taking antipsychotics, died, or the study ended. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, participants receiving atypical antipsychotics showed no significant increase in risk of ischaemic stroke compared with those receiving typical antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.26). This finding was consistent in a series of subgroup analyses, including ones of individual atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) and selected subpopulations of the main cohorts. CONCLUSION: Older adults with dementia who take atypical antipsychotics have a similar risk of ischaemic stroke to those taking typical antipsychotics.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathmeyers_pp/66
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute


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