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dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Navonil
dc.contributor.authorBhattacharya, Raja
dc.contributor.authorGorczyca, Michael
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Kevin M.
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Michael M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:29.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:32:40Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:32:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-06
dc.date.submitted2017-05-15
dc.identifier.citationPLoS Genet. 2017 Apr 6;13(4):e1006697. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006697. eCollection 2017 Apr. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006697">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1553-7390 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pgen.1006697
dc.identifier.pmid28384151
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/37931
dc.description<p>First author Navonil Banerjee is a doctoral student in the Neuroscience Program in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at UMass Medical School.</p>
dc.description.abstractAnimal behaviors are often composed of distinct alternating behavioral states. Neuromodulatory signals are thought to be critical for establishing stable behavioral states and for orchestrating transitions between them. However, we have only a limited understanding of how neuromodulatory systems act in vivo to alter circuit performance and shape behavior. To address these questions, we have investigated neuromodulatory signaling in the context of Caenorhabditis elegans egg-laying. Egg-laying activity cycles between discrete states-short bursts of egg deposition (active phases) that alternate with prolonged quiescent periods (inactive phases). Here using genetic, pharmacological and optogenetic approaches for cell-specific activation and inhibition, we show that a group of neurosecretory cells (uv1) located in close spatial proximity to the egg-laying neuromusculature direct the temporal organization of egg-laying by prolonging the duration of inactive phases. We demonstrate that the modulatory effects of the uv1 cells are mediated by peptides encoded by the nlp-7 and flp-11 genes that act locally to inhibit circuit activity, primarily by inhibiting vesicular release of serotonin from HSN motor neurons. This peptidergic inhibition is achieved, at least in part, by reducing synaptic vesicle abundance in the HSN motor neurons. By linking the in vivo actions of specific neuropeptide signaling systems with the generation of stable behavioral outcomes, our study reveals how cycles of neuromodulation emanating from non-neuronal cells can fundamentally shape the organization of a behavioral program.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=28384151&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2017 Banerjee et al.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectmotor neurons
dc.subjectneuromodulatory signaling
dc.subjectserotonin
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.titleLocal neuropeptide signaling modulates serotonergic transmission to shape the temporal organization of C. elegans egg-laying behavior
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS genetics
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1203&amp;context=neurobiology_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/neurobiology_pp/204
dc.identifier.contextkey10165759
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:32:40Z
html.description.abstract<p>Animal behaviors are often composed of distinct alternating behavioral states. Neuromodulatory signals are thought to be critical for establishing stable behavioral states and for orchestrating transitions between them. However, we have only a limited understanding of how neuromodulatory systems act in vivo to alter circuit performance and shape behavior. To address these questions, we have investigated neuromodulatory signaling in the context of Caenorhabditis elegans egg-laying. Egg-laying activity cycles between discrete states-short bursts of egg deposition (active phases) that alternate with prolonged quiescent periods (inactive phases). Here using genetic, pharmacological and optogenetic approaches for cell-specific activation and inhibition, we show that a group of neurosecretory cells (uv1) located in close spatial proximity to the egg-laying neuromusculature direct the temporal organization of egg-laying by prolonging the duration of inactive phases. We demonstrate that the modulatory effects of the uv1 cells are mediated by peptides encoded by the nlp-7 and flp-11 genes that act locally to inhibit circuit activity, primarily by inhibiting vesicular release of serotonin from HSN motor neurons. This peptidergic inhibition is achieved, at least in part, by reducing synaptic vesicle abundance in the HSN motor neurons. By linking the in vivo actions of specific neuropeptide signaling systems with the generation of stable behavioral outcomes, our study reveals how cycles of neuromodulation emanating from non-neuronal cells can fundamentally shape the organization of a behavioral program.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathneurobiology_pp/204
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentFrancis Lab
dc.contributor.departmentNeurobiology
dc.source.pagese1006697
dc.contributor.studentNavonil Banerjee
dc.description.thesisprogramNeuroscience


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Copyright: © 2017 Banerjee et al.
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