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dc.contributor.authorRichter, Joel D.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:33.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:35:12Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:35:12Z
dc.date.issued1999-06-05
dc.date.submitted2009-03-24
dc.identifier.citationMicrobiol Mol Biol Rev. 1999 Jun;63(2):446-56. <a href="http://mmbr.asm.org/cgi/reprint/63/2/446">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1092-2172 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid10357857
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/38504
dc.description.abstractMaternal mRNA translation is regulated in large part by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. This process, which occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, is essential for meiosis and body patterning. In spite of the evolutionary conservation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation, many of the cis elements and trans-acting factors appear to have some species specificity. With the recent isolation and cloning of factors involved in both poly(A) elongation and deadenylation, the underlying biochemistry of these reactions is beginning to be elucidated. In addition to early development, cytoplasmic polyadenylation is now known to occur in the adult brain, and there is circumstantial evidence that this process occurs at synapses, where it could mediate the long-lasting phase of long-term potentiation, which is probably the basis of learning and memory. Finally, there may be multiple mechanisms by which polyadenylation promotes translation. Important questions yet to be answered in the field of cytoplasmic polyadenylation are addressed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=10357857&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectCaenorhabditis elegans
dc.subjectCalcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
dc.subjectDrosophila
dc.subjectLong-Term Potentiation
dc.subjectMice
dc.subjectOocytes
dc.subjectRNA, Messenger
dc.subjectTranscription, Genetic
dc.subjectVisual Cortex
dc.subjectXenopus
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleCytoplasmic polyadenylation in development and beyond
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMicrobiology and molecular biology reviews : MMBR
dc.source.volume63
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2376&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/1377
dc.identifier.contextkey794874
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:35:12Z
html.description.abstract<p>Maternal mRNA translation is regulated in large part by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. This process, which occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, is essential for meiosis and body patterning. In spite of the evolutionary conservation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation, many of the cis elements and trans-acting factors appear to have some species specificity. With the recent isolation and cloning of factors involved in both poly(A) elongation and deadenylation, the underlying biochemistry of these reactions is beginning to be elucidated. In addition to early development, cytoplasmic polyadenylation is now known to occur in the adult brain, and there is circumstantial evidence that this process occurs at synapses, where it could mediate the long-lasting phase of long-term potentiation, which is probably the basis of learning and memory. Finally, there may be multiple mechanisms by which polyadenylation promotes translation. Important questions yet to be answered in the field of cytoplasmic polyadenylation are addressed.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/1377
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
dc.source.pages446-56


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