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dc.contributor.authorRadman-Livaja, Marta
dc.contributor.authorVerzijlbergen, Kitty F.
dc.contributor.authorWeiner, Assaf
dc.contributor.authorvan Welsem, Tibor
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, Nir
dc.contributor.authorRando, Oliver J.
dc.contributor.authorvan Leeuwen, Fred
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:40.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:39:47Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:39:47Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-07
dc.date.submitted2012-09-06
dc.identifier.citationRadman-Livaja M, Verzijlbergen KF, Weiner A, van Welsem T, Friedman N, et al. (2011) Patterns and Mechanisms of Ancestral Histone Protein Inheritance in Budding Yeast. PLoS Biol 9(6): e1001075. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001075. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001075" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1544-9173 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.1001075
dc.identifier.pmid21666805
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/39548
dc.description.abstractReplicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5' ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21666805&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2011 Radman-Livaja et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.subjectDNA Replication Timing
dc.subjectDNA Topoisomerases, Type I
dc.subjectGenes, Fungal
dc.subjectHistones
dc.subjectInheritance Patterns
dc.subjectKinetics
dc.subjectModels, Biological
dc.subjectMutation
dc.subjectNucleosomes
dc.subjectProtein Processing, Post-Translational
dc.subjectSaccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
dc.subjectSaccharomycetales
dc.subjectTranscription, Genetic
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titlePatterns and mechanisms of ancestral histone protein inheritance in budding yeast
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS biology
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3343&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/2343
dc.identifier.contextkey3299938
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:39:48Z
html.description.abstract<p>Replicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5' ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/2343
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
dc.source.pagese1001075


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