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dc.contributor.authorVolkman, Julie E.
dc.contributor.authorLuger, Tana M.
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Kimberly L.L.
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Timothy P.
dc.contributor.authorShimada, Stephanie L
dc.contributor.authorAmante, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorMcInnes, D. Keith
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Hua
dc.contributor.authorHouston, Thomas K.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:41.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:40:18Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-06
dc.date.submitted2014-12-08
dc.identifier.citationBMC Fam Pract. 2014 Jun 6;15:111. doi: 10.1186/1471-2296-15-111. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-15-111" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's website.</a>
dc.identifier.issn1471-2296
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-15-111
dc.identifier.pmid24906558
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/39657
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The need to understand preferred sources of health information remains important to providing patient-centered care. The Internet remains a popular resource for health information, but more traditional sources may still be valid for patients during a recent health need. This study sought to understand the characteristics of patients that turn to their doctor or healthcare provider first for a recent health or medical information need. METHODS: Using the national cross-sectional survey, Health Information National Trend Study [HINTS], characteristics of those who sought a doctor or healthcare provider for a recent health information need were compared to other sources. Weighted survey responses from Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 of the HINTS survey were used for multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: A total 5,307 patient responses were analyzed. Overall, those who seek a doctor or healthcare provider first for a health need are female, 46-64 years, White non-Hispanic, educated, in good health and users of the Internet. Yet, adjusted logistic regressions showed that those who sought a doctor or healthcare provider first during a recent health information need compared to other sources were most likely to be 65+ years, in poor health, less educated and have health insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who seek their doctor or healthcare provider first for health information rather than other sources of information represent a unique population. Doctors or healthcare providers remain an important resource for these patients during recent needs, despite the wide use of the Internet as a source of health information.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=24906558&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.rights© 2014 Volkman et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0">http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0</a>), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectHealth information needs
dc.subjectSources for health information
dc.subjectDoctor-patient communication
dc.subjectNational cross-sectional survey
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectHealth Communication
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectOncology
dc.titleThe National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey [HINTS]: a national cross-sectional analysis of talking to your doctor and other healthcare providers for health information
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBMC family practice [electronic resource]
dc.source.volume15
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3448&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/2455
dc.identifier.contextkey6434694
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:40:18Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: The need to understand preferred sources of health information remains important to providing patient-centered care. The Internet remains a popular resource for health information, but more traditional sources may still be valid for patients during a recent health need. This study sought to understand the characteristics of patients that turn to their doctor or healthcare provider first for a recent health or medical information need.</p> <p>METHODS: Using the national cross-sectional survey, Health Information National Trend Study [HINTS], characteristics of those who sought a doctor or healthcare provider for a recent health information need were compared to other sources. Weighted survey responses from Cycle 1 and Cycle 2 of the HINTS survey were used for multivariable logistic regression.</p> <p>RESULTS: A total 5,307 patient responses were analyzed. Overall, those who seek a doctor or healthcare provider first for a health need are female, 46-64 years, White non-Hispanic, educated, in good health and users of the Internet. Yet, adjusted logistic regressions showed that those who sought a doctor or healthcare provider first during a recent health information need compared to other sources were most likely to be 65+ years, in poor health, less educated and have health insurance.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Patients who seek their doctor or healthcare provider first for health information rather than other sources of information represent a unique population. Doctors or healthcare providers remain an important resource for these patients during recent needs, despite the wide use of the Internet as a source of health information.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/2455
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pages111


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