Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGulia-Nuss,, Monika
dc.contributor.authorCaffrey, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.authorSilverman, Neal S.
dc.contributor.authorWespiser, Adam R.
dc.contributor.authorHill, Catherine A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:44.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:41:44Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:41:44Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-09
dc.date.submitted2016-05-18
dc.identifier.citationNat Commun. 2016 Feb 9;7:10507. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10507. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10507">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms10507
dc.identifier.pmid26856261
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/39944
dc.description<p>Full author list omitted for brevity. For full list of authors see article.</p>
dc.description.abstractTicks transmit more pathogens to humans and animals than any other arthropod. We describe the 2.1 Gbp nuclear genome of the tick, Ixodes scapularis (Say), which vectors pathogens that cause Lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, babesiosis and other diseases. The large genome reflects accumulation of repetitive DNA, new lineages of retro-transposons, and gene architecture patterns resembling ancient metazoans rather than pancrustaceans. Annotation of scaffolds representing approximately 57% of the genome, reveals 20,486 protein-coding genes and expansions of gene families associated with tick-host interactions. We report insights from genome analyses into parasitic processes unique to ticks, including host 'questing', prolonged feeding, cuticle synthesis, blood meal concentration, novel methods of haemoglobin digestion, haem detoxification, vitellogenesis and prolonged off-host survival. We identify proteins associated with the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, an emerging disease, and the encephalitis-causing Langat virus, and a population structure correlated to life-history traits and transmission of the Lyme disease agent.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=26856261&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBacterial Infections and Mycoses
dc.subjectGenomics
dc.subjectImmunology of Infectious Disease
dc.subjectImmunopathology
dc.titleGenomic insights into the Ixodes scapularis tick vector of Lyme disease
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleNature communications
dc.source.volume7
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3758&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/2753
dc.identifier.contextkey8614705
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:41:44Z
html.description.abstract<p>Ticks transmit more pathogens to humans and animals than any other arthropod. We describe the 2.1 Gbp nuclear genome of the tick, Ixodes scapularis (Say), which vectors pathogens that cause Lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, babesiosis and other diseases. The large genome reflects accumulation of repetitive DNA, new lineages of retro-transposons, and gene architecture patterns resembling ancient metazoans rather than pancrustaceans. Annotation of scaffolds representing approximately 57% of the genome, reveals 20,486 protein-coding genes and expansions of gene families associated with tick-host interactions. We report insights from genome analyses into parasitic processes unique to ticks, including host 'questing', prolonged feeding, cuticle synthesis, blood meal concentration, novel methods of haemoglobin digestion, haem detoxification, vitellogenesis and prolonged off-host survival. We identify proteins associated with the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, an emerging disease, and the encephalitis-causing Langat virus, and a population structure correlated to life-history traits and transmission of the Lyme disease agent.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/2753
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology
dc.source.pages10507


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ncomms10507.pdf
Size:
3.365Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.