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dc.contributor.authorSilfee, Valerie J.
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorSreedhara, Meera
dc.contributor.authorLora, Vilma
dc.contributor.authorLemon, Stephenie C
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:46.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:42:44Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:42:44Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-13
dc.date.submitted2017-01-09
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health. 2016 Sep 13;16:966. doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3650-4. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-3650-4">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-016-3650-4
dc.identifier.pmid27619205
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/40153
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: U.S. Latinos experience high rates of cardio-metabolic diseases and have high rates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior. Understanding the environmental factors associated with physical activity and sedentary behaviors among Latinos could inform future interventions. The purpose of this study is to explore the neighborhood environment correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior in a sample of U.S. Latino adults. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 602 Latino adults in Lawrence, MA. Survey assessments of physical activity, sedentary behavior, and neighborhood environment were verbally administered. The neighborhood environment scale assessed violence, safety, aesthetic quality, walkability, availability of healthy foods, social cohesion, and activities with neighbors. RESULTS: After controlling forage, gender, education, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status, two variables were associated with the outcomes of interest. Living in more walkable neighborhoods was associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in adequate levels of physical activity ( > 150 min per week, as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)) (OR = 1.403, p = .018); and greater frequency of activities with neighbors was associated with greater sedentary behavior (beta = .072, p = .05). CONCLUSIONS: There were different neighborhood environment correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior in this Latino community. Focusing on a greater understanding of the distinct social and physical environmental correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior may provide important insights for reducing CVD risk and health disparities among Latinos.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=27619205&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease
dc.subjectHispanic
dc.subjectLatino
dc.subjectNeighborhood environment
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.subjectSedentary behavior
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.titleNeighborhood environment correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior among Latino adults in Massachusetts
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBMC public health
dc.source.volume16
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3957&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/2952
dc.identifier.contextkey9532621
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:42:44Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: U.S. Latinos experience high rates of cardio-metabolic diseases and have high rates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior. Understanding the environmental factors associated with physical activity and sedentary behaviors among Latinos could inform future interventions. The purpose of this study is to explore the neighborhood environment correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior in a sample of U.S. Latino adults.</p> <p>METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 602 Latino adults in Lawrence, MA. Survey assessments of physical activity, sedentary behavior, and neighborhood environment were verbally administered. The neighborhood environment scale assessed violence, safety, aesthetic quality, walkability, availability of healthy foods, social cohesion, and activities with neighbors.</p> <p>RESULTS: After controlling forage, gender, education, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status, two variables were associated with the outcomes of interest. Living in more walkable neighborhoods was associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in adequate levels of physical activity ( > 150 min per week, as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)) (OR = 1.403, p = .018); and greater frequency of activities with neighbors was associated with greater sedentary behavior (beta = .072, p = .05).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: There were different neighborhood environment correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior in this Latino community. Focusing on a greater understanding of the distinct social and physical environmental correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior may provide important insights for reducing CVD risk and health disparities among Latinos.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/2952
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages966


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