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dc.contributor.authorFerris, Craig F.
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Mads F.
dc.contributor.authorMessenger, Tara L.
dc.contributor.authorKoppel, Gary A.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:48.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:43:48Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:43:48Z
dc.date.issued2001-09-08
dc.date.submitted2008-04-14
dc.identifier.citationBMC Neurosci. 2001;2:10. Epub 2001 Aug 15.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2202 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2202-2-10
dc.identifier.pmid11545675
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/40374
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Alterations in arginine vasopressin regulation and secretion have been proposed as one possible biochemical abnormality in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. In golden hamsters, arginine vasopressin microinjections into the anterior hypothalamus trigger robust grooming and flank marking, a stereotyped scent marking behaviors. The intensity and repetition of the behaviors induced by arginine vasopressin is somewhat reminiscent of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in humans. The present experiments were carried out to test whether pharmacological agents used to alleviate obsessive compulsive disorder could inhibit arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. RESULTS: Male golden hamsters were treated daily for two weeks with either vehicle, fluoxetine, clomipramine, or desipramine (an ineffective drug), before being tested for arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. Flank marking was significantly inhibited in animals treated with fluoxetine or clomipramine but unaffected by treatment with desipramine. Grooming behavior was not affected by any treatment. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking may serve as an animal model for screening drugs used in the control of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11545675&dopt=Abstract ">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.subjectAdrenergic Uptake Inhibitors
dc.subjectAggression
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectArginine Vasopressin
dc.subjectBehavior, Animal
dc.subjectClomipramine
dc.subjectCricetinae
dc.subjectDesipramine
dc.subjectDose-Response Relationship, Drug
dc.subjectFluoxetine
dc.subjectGrooming
dc.subjectHair
dc.subjectHypothalamus
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMicroinjections
dc.subjectObsessive-Compulsive Disorder
dc.subjectPigmentation
dc.subjectSerotonin Agonists
dc.subjectSerotonin Uptake Inhibitors
dc.subjectNeuroscience and Neurobiology
dc.titleVasopressin-dependent flank marking in golden hamsters is suppressed by drugs used in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBMC neuroscience
dc.source.volume2
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1317&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/318
dc.identifier.contextkey489656
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:43:49Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Alterations in arginine vasopressin regulation and secretion have been proposed as one possible biochemical abnormality in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. In golden hamsters, arginine vasopressin microinjections into the anterior hypothalamus trigger robust grooming and flank marking, a stereotyped scent marking behaviors. The intensity and repetition of the behaviors induced by arginine vasopressin is somewhat reminiscent of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in humans. The present experiments were carried out to test whether pharmacological agents used to alleviate obsessive compulsive disorder could inhibit arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. RESULTS: Male golden hamsters were treated daily for two weeks with either vehicle, fluoxetine, clomipramine, or desipramine (an ineffective drug), before being tested for arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking and grooming. Flank marking was significantly inhibited in animals treated with fluoxetine or clomipramine but unaffected by treatment with desipramine. Grooming behavior was not affected by any treatment. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that arginine vasopressin-induced flank marking may serve as an animal model for screening drugs used in the control of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/318
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Behavioral Neuroscience
dc.source.pages10


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