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dc.contributor.authorFasullo, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Azzawi, Yasir
dc.contributor.authorAbergel, Jeffrey
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:48.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:43:56Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-19
dc.date.submitted2017-12-19
dc.identifier.citationACG Case Rep J. 2017 Jul 19;4:e87. doi: 10.14309/crj.2017.87. eCollection 2017. <a href="https://doi.org/10.14309/crj.2017.87">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn2326-3253 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.14309/crj.2017.87
dc.identifier.pmid28761890
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/40401
dc.description.abstractMicroscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory condition of the large bowel that is associated with chronic, nonbloody diarrhea. Colonoscopy usually demonstrates normal mucosa, while tissue biopsy reveals intraepithelial lymphocytes or a subepithelial collagen band. Although no specific antibody has been discovered, MC is associated with several autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and rheumatoid arthritis. There are only a small number of case reports documenting possible hereditary MC cases, but up to 12% of patients with MC have a family history of inflammatory bowel disease. Other associations include proton pump inhibitor use, cigarette smoking, HLA-DQ2/86, and possibly some gastrointestinal infections.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=28761890&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2017 Fasullo et al. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectDigestive System Diseases
dc.subjectGastroenterology
dc.subjectPathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms
dc.titleMicroscopic Colitis After Fecal Microbiota Transplant
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleACG case reports journal
dc.source.volume4
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4214&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/3206
dc.identifier.contextkey11271867
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:43:56Z
html.description.abstract<p>Microscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory condition of the large bowel that is associated with chronic, nonbloody diarrhea. Colonoscopy usually demonstrates normal mucosa, while tissue biopsy reveals intraepithelial lymphocytes or a subepithelial collagen band. Although no specific antibody has been discovered, MC is associated with several autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and rheumatoid arthritis. There are only a small number of case reports documenting possible hereditary MC cases, but up to 12% of patients with MC have a family history of inflammatory bowel disease. Other associations include proton pump inhibitor use, cigarette smoking, HLA-DQ2/86, and possibly some gastrointestinal infections.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/3206
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine
dc.source.pagese87


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Copyright: © 2017 Fasullo et al. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2017 Fasullo et al. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.