Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOzcan, Ezgi
dc.contributor.authorSela, David
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:50.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:45:25Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:45:25Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-30
dc.date.submitted2018-07-24
dc.identifier.citation<p>Front Nutr. 2018 May 30;5:46. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2018.00046. eCollection 2018. <a href="https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2018.00046">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2296-861X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnut.2018.00046
dc.identifier.pmid29900174
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/40678
dc.description.abstractHuman milk contains a high concentration of indigestible oligosaccharides, which likely mediated the coevolution of the nursing infant with its gut microbiome. Specifically, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) often colonizes the infant gut and utilizes these human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) to enrich their abundance. In this study, the physiology and mechanisms underlying B. infantis utilization of two HMO isomers lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) and lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) was investigated in addition to their carbohydrate constituents. Both LNT and LNnT utilization induced a significant shift in the ratio of secreted acetate to lactate (1.7-2.0) in contrast to the catabolism of their component carbohydrates (~1.5). Inefficient metabolism of LNnT prompts B. infantis to shunt carbon toward formic acid and ethanol secretion. The global transcriptome presents genomic features differentially expressed to catabolize these two HMO species that vary by a single glycosidic linkage. Furthermore, a measure of strain-level variation exists between B. infantis isolates. Regardless of strain, inefficient HMO metabolism induces the metabolic shift toward formic acid and ethanol production. Furthermore, bifidobacterial metabolites reduced LPS-induced inflammation in a cell culture model. Thus, differential metabolism of milk glycans potentially drives the emergent physiology of host-microbial interactions to impact infant health.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29900174&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 Ozcan and Sela. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBifidobacteria
dc.subjecthost-microbial interactions
dc.subjecthuman milk oligosaccharide
dc.subjectlacto-N-neotetraose. lacto-N-tetraose
dc.subjectmicrobiota
dc.subjectDietetics and Clinical Nutrition
dc.subjectFood Microbiology
dc.subjectMicrobial Physiology
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.titleInefficient Metabolism of the Human Milk Oligosaccharides Lacto-N-tetraose and Lacto-N-neotetraose Shifts Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Physiology
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in nutrition
dc.source.volume5
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4491&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/3480
dc.identifier.contextkey12535424
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:45:25Z
html.description.abstract<p>Human milk contains a high concentration of indigestible oligosaccharides, which likely mediated the coevolution of the nursing infant with its gut microbiome. Specifically, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) often colonizes the infant gut and utilizes these human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) to enrich their abundance. In this study, the physiology and mechanisms underlying B. infantis utilization of two HMO isomers lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) and lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) was investigated in addition to their carbohydrate constituents. Both LNT and LNnT utilization induced a significant shift in the ratio of secreted acetate to lactate (1.7-2.0) in contrast to the catabolism of their component carbohydrates (~1.5). Inefficient metabolism of LNnT prompts B. infantis to shunt carbon toward formic acid and ethanol secretion. The global transcriptome presents genomic features differentially expressed to catabolize these two HMO species that vary by a single glycosidic linkage. Furthermore, a measure of strain-level variation exists between B. infantis isolates. Regardless of strain, inefficient HMO metabolism induces the metabolic shift toward formic acid and ethanol production. Furthermore, bifidobacterial metabolites reduced LPS-induced inflammation in a cell culture model. Thus, differential metabolism of milk glycans potentially drives the emergent physiology of host-microbial interactions to impact infant health.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/3480
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Microbiome Research
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology and Physiological Systems
dc.source.pages46


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
fnut_05_00046_1_.pdf
Size:
3.395Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2018 Ozcan and Sela. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2018 Ozcan and Sela. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.