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dc.contributor.authorSpillane, Ailbhe
dc.contributor.authorMatvienko-Sikar, Karen
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Celine
dc.contributor.authorCorcoran, Paul
dc.contributor.authorArensman, Ella
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:54.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:48:02Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:48:02Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-01
dc.date.submitted2019-10-17
dc.identifier.citation<p>Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec;14(1):1563430. doi: 10.1080/17482631.2018.1563430. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/17482631.2018.1563430">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1748-2623 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17482631.2018.1563430
dc.identifier.pmid30693845
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/41195
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Suicide bereavement confers unique risk and distress. In several countries, bereaved family members are called on to attend an inquest, an official public inquiry into deaths caused by external factors. The current study aimed to explore how suicide-bereaved family members (n = 18) experienced the inquest process, through qualitative semi-structured interviews. METHOD: Participants were identified via coroner's records and had previously taken part in a case-control study. RESULTS: Qualitative findings indicated four overall themes with respect to family members' experiences of the inquest process: "inquest as fearfully unknown", "structural processes of the inquest", "enduring public and private pain to obtain answers" and "gaining answers and making sense". Most family members experienced distress and fear as a result of several elements of the inquest process. Some participants had positive experiences but these did not outweigh the distress experienced by the majority of family members regarding their overall experience of the inquest process. CONCLUSIONS: Key recommendations include informing family members of the main aspects and purpose of the inquest process beforehand, adapting the process to maximise the privacy and comfort of the bereaved relatives, and restricting graphic evidence being heard, where possible, to minimise distress experienced by family members.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30693845&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2019 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectInquest
dc.subjectbereavement
dc.subjectcoroner
dc.subjectfamily members
dc.subjectqualitative
dc.subjectsuicide
dc.subjectFamily, Life Course, and Society
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectPsychological Phenomena and Processes
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectQuantitative, Qualitative, Comparative, and Historical Methodologies
dc.titleHow suicide-bereaved family members experience the inquest process: a qualitative study using thematic analysis
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleInternational journal of qualitative studies on health and well-being
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4999&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/3982
dc.identifier.contextkey15570731
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:48:02Z
html.description.abstract<p>PURPOSE: Suicide bereavement confers unique risk and distress. In several countries, bereaved family members are called on to attend an inquest, an official public inquiry into deaths caused by external factors. The current study aimed to explore how suicide-bereaved family members (n = 18) experienced the inquest process, through qualitative semi-structured interviews.</p> <p>METHOD: Participants were identified via coroner's records and had previously taken part in a case-control study.</p> <p>RESULTS: Qualitative findings indicated four overall themes with respect to family members' experiences of the inquest process: "inquest as fearfully unknown", "structural processes of the inquest", "enduring public and private pain to obtain answers" and "gaining answers and making sense". Most family members experienced distress and fear as a result of several elements of the inquest process. Some participants had positive experiences but these did not outweigh the distress experienced by the majority of family members regarding their overall experience of the inquest process.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Key recommendations include informing family members of the main aspects and purpose of the inquest process beforehand, adapting the process to maximise the privacy and comfort of the bereaved relatives, and restricting graphic evidence being heard, where possible, to minimise distress experienced by family members.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/3982
dc.contributor.departmentImplementation Science and Practice Advances Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Emergency Medicine
dc.source.pages1563430


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© 2019 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.