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dc.contributor.authorBoehmer, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorClark, Melissa A.
dc.contributor.authorOzonoff, Al
dc.contributor.authorCeballos, Rachel M.
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Michael
dc.contributor.authorHartshorn, Kevan L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:55.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:48:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:48:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-13
dc.date.submitted2020-01-13
dc.identifier.citation<p>Health Equity. 2019 Dec 13;3(1):619-627. doi: 10.1089/heq.2019.0062. eCollection 2019. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1089/heq.2019.0062">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2473-1242 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/heq.2019.0062
dc.identifier.pmid31872167
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/41308
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Quality cancer care entails receipt of a Survivorship Care Plan (SCP). The purpose of this study was to determine differences in SCP delivery by patient-level and neighborhood characteristics. Methods: We obtained California cancer registry data on individuals who were diagnosed with stage I, II, or III colorectal cancer (CRC) between 2012 and 2015 and resided in predetermined geographic areas. We then mailed them a questionnaire, which queried about receipt of a SCP and its content. SCP was defined by content, as summary of cancer treatment, cancer surveillance recommendations, and/or an individualized preventive care. Using logistic regression modeling, each measure of SCP, as well as the summary measure (none vs. any), was evaluated by person-level characteristics. Subsequently, neighborhood-level characteristics were added to the model to explore their additional value. Results: Overall 80% of CRC survivors received a SCP. Receipt of SCPs was associated with person-level characteristics, while neighborhood characteristics did not make an additional contribution. Young, male employed survivors and those with more recent diagnoses or later cancer stages had greater odds of receiving a SCP. Conclusion: When providing SCPs, health care providers prioritize patient groups who they may perceive as vulnerable or likely to benefit from SCPs.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=31872167&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rightsCopyright Ulrike Boehmer et al. 2019; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectcolorectal cancer
dc.subjectquality of cancer care
dc.subjectsurvivorship care plan
dc.subjectClinical Epidemiology
dc.subjectDigestive System Diseases
dc.subjectEpidemiology
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.titleNeighborhood Characteristics and Colorectal Cancer Survivors' Quality of Care
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleHealth equity
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5113&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/4094
dc.identifier.contextkey16192401
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:48:39Z
html.description.abstract<p>Purpose: Quality cancer care entails receipt of a Survivorship Care Plan (SCP). The purpose of this study was to determine differences in SCP delivery by patient-level and neighborhood characteristics.</p> <p>Methods: We obtained California cancer registry data on individuals who were diagnosed with stage I, II, or III colorectal cancer (CRC) between 2012 and 2015 and resided in predetermined geographic areas. We then mailed them a questionnaire, which queried about receipt of a SCP and its content. SCP was defined by content, as summary of cancer treatment, cancer surveillance recommendations, and/or an individualized preventive care. Using logistic regression modeling, each measure of SCP, as well as the summary measure (none vs. any), was evaluated by person-level characteristics. Subsequently, neighborhood-level characteristics were added to the model to explore their additional value.</p> <p>Results: Overall 80% of CRC survivors received a SCP. Receipt of SCPs was associated with person-level characteristics, while neighborhood characteristics did not make an additional contribution. Young, male employed survivors and those with more recent diagnoses or later cancer stages had greater odds of receiving a SCP.</p> <p>Conclusion: When providing SCPs, health care providers prioritize patient groups who they may perceive as vulnerable or likely to benefit from SCPs.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/4094
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Sciences
dc.source.pages619-627


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Copyright Ulrike Boehmer et al. 2019; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright Ulrike Boehmer et al. 2019; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.