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dc.contributor.authorWellman, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorSylvestre, Marie-Pierre
dc.contributor.authorAbi Nader, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorChiolero, Arnaud
dc.contributor.authorMesidor, Miceline
dc.contributor.authorDugas, Erika N.
dc.contributor.authorTougri, Gauthier
dc.contributor.authorO'Loughlin, Jennifer
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:55.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:48:48Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:48:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-19
dc.date.submitted2020-02-18
dc.identifier.citation<p>Wellman RJ, Sylvestre MP, Abi Nader P, Chiolero A, Mesidor M, Dugas EN, Tougri G, O'Loughlin J. Intensity and frequency of physical activity and high blood pressure in adolescents: A longitudinal study. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2020 Jan 19:10.1111/jch.13806. doi: 10.1111/jch.13806. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 31955514. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/jch.13806">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1524-6175 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jch.13806
dc.identifier.pmid31955514
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/41338
dc.description.abstractDespite limited evidence on the association between physical activity (PA) and blood pressure (BP) in youth, experts recommend that adolescents engage regularly in moderate-to-vigorous PA. We examined the relationships between PA intensity and frequency and the likelihood of having high BP in a population-based cohort of adolescents from Montreal, Canada. PA was self-reported every 3 months from grade 7 to 11, and BP was measured at ages 12.8, 15.2, and 17.0 years on average. We analyzed data from 993 participants (mean [SD] age = 16.0 [1.0], 51.6% female) with BP data at ages 15.2 and/or 17.0 years, using pooled ordinal logistic regression. BP (normal/elevated/hypertensive range) was the outcome, and past-year PA intensity and frequency were potential predictors. Eight percent of participants had elevated BP (120-129/ < 80), and 3.2% had BP in the hypertensive range ( > /=130/ > /=80). Participants engaged in a median (interquartile range) of 7.0 (4.5, 9.3) and 5.5 (2, 10.8) moderate and vigorous PA sessions/week, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, mother's education, use of alcohol and cigarette consumption, engaging in PA more intense than light during the previous year was associated with a lower odds of having BP in the hypertensive range (ORs [95% CIs] = 0.93 [0.88, 0.97] to 0.97 [0.94, 0.99]). The relationships were not altered by adjusting for BMI. Our findings support recommendations that adolescents engage in at least moderate PA on a regular basis to prevent development of BP in the hypertensive range.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=31955514&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1111/jch.13806
dc.subjectadolescents
dc.subjectblood pressure
dc.subjecthypertension
dc.subjectphysical activity
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleIntensity and frequency of physical activity and high blood pressure in adolescents: A longitudinal study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/4122
dc.identifier.contextkey16574434
html.description.abstract<p>Despite limited evidence on the association between physical activity (PA) and blood pressure (BP) in youth, experts recommend that adolescents engage regularly in moderate-to-vigorous PA. We examined the relationships between PA intensity and frequency and the likelihood of having high BP in a population-based cohort of adolescents from Montreal, Canada. PA was self-reported every 3 months from grade 7 to 11, and BP was measured at ages 12.8, 15.2, and 17.0 years on average. We analyzed data from 993 participants (mean [SD] age = 16.0 [1.0], 51.6% female) with BP data at ages 15.2 and/or 17.0 years, using pooled ordinal logistic regression. BP (normal/elevated/hypertensive range) was the outcome, and past-year PA intensity and frequency were potential predictors. Eight percent of participants had elevated BP (120-129/ < 80), and 3.2% had BP in the hypertensive range ( > /=130/ > /=80). Participants engaged in a median (interquartile range) of 7.0 (4.5, 9.3) and 5.5 (2, 10.8) moderate and vigorous PA sessions/week, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, mother's education, use of alcohol and cigarette consumption, engaging in PA more intense than light during the previous year was associated with a lower odds of having BP in the hypertensive range (ORs [95% CIs] = 0.93 [0.88, 0.97] to 0.97 [0.94, 0.99]). The relationships were not altered by adjusting for BMI. Our findings support recommendations that adolescents engage in at least moderate PA on a regular basis to prevent development of BP in the hypertensive range.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/4122
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine


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