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dc.contributor.authorPierce, Jacob B.
dc.contributor.authorKershaw, Kiarri N.
dc.contributor.authorKiefe, Catarina I.
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, David R. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorSidney, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorMerkin, Sharon Stein.
dc.contributor.authorFeinglass, Joe
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:56.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:49:18Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:49:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-05
dc.date.submitted2020-05-13
dc.identifier.citation<p>Pierce JB, Kershaw KN, Kiefe CI, Jacobs DR Jr, Sidney S, Merkin SS, Feinglass J. Association of Childhood Psychosocial Environment With 30-Year Cardiovascular Disease Incidence and Mortality in Middle Age. J Am Heart Assoc. 2020 May 5;9(9):e015326. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.119.015326. Epub 2020 Apr 28. PMID: 32342717. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.119.015326">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn2047-9980 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/JAHA.119.015326
dc.identifier.pmid32342717
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/41435
dc.description.abstractBackground Childhood adversity and trauma have been shown to be associated with poorer cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in adulthood. However, longitudinal studies of this association are rare. Methods and Results Our study used the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study, a longitudinal cohort that has followed participants from recruitment in 1985-1986 through 2018, to determine how childhood psychosocial environment relates to CVD incidence and all-cause mortality in middle age. Participants (n=3646) completed the Childhood Family Environment (CFE) questionnaire at the year 15 (2000-2001) CARDIA examination and were grouped by high, moderate, or low relative CFE adversity scores. We used sequential multivariable regression models to estimate hazard ratios of incident (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Participants were 25.1+/-3.6 years old, 47% black, and 56% female at baseline and 198 participants developed CVD (17.9 per 10 000 person-years) during follow-up. CVD incidence was > 50% higher for those in the high CFE adversity group compared with those in the low CFE adversity group. In fully adjusted models, CVD hazard ratios (95% CI) for participants who reported high and moderate CFE adversity versus those reporting low CFE adversity were 1.40 (0.98-2.11) and 1.25 (0.89-1.75), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality was 1.68 (1.17-2.41) for those with high CFE adversity scores and 1.55 (1.11-2.17) for those with moderate CFE adversity scores. Conclusions Adverse CFE was associated with CVD incidence and all-cause mortality later in life, even after controlling for CVD risk factors in young adulthood.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=32342717&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectadverse childhood experiences
dc.subjectcardiovascular events
dc.subjectlifetime risk
dc.subjectlongitudinal cohort study
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectstress
dc.subjectCardiology
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subjectHealth Psychology
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectSocial Psychology
dc.titleAssociation of Childhood Psychosocial Environment With 30-Year Cardiovascular Disease Incidence and Mortality in Middle Age
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of the American Heart Association
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue9
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5234&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/4215
dc.identifier.contextkey17724368
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:49:18Z
html.description.abstract<p>Background</p> <p>Childhood adversity and trauma have been shown to be associated with poorer cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in adulthood. However, longitudinal studies of this association are rare.</p> <p>Methods and Results</p> <p>Our study used the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study, a longitudinal cohort that has followed participants from recruitment in 1985-1986 through 2018, to determine how childhood psychosocial environment relates to CVD incidence and all-cause mortality in middle age. Participants (n=3646) completed the Childhood Family Environment (CFE) questionnaire at the year 15 (2000-2001) CARDIA examination and were grouped by high, moderate, or low relative CFE adversity scores. We used sequential multivariable regression models to estimate hazard ratios of incident (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Participants were 25.1+/-3.6 years old, 47% black, and 56% female at baseline and 198 participants developed CVD (17.9 per 10 000 person-years) during follow-up. CVD incidence was > 50% higher for those in the high CFE adversity group compared with those in the low CFE adversity group. In fully adjusted models, CVD hazard ratios (95% CI) for participants who reported high and moderate CFE adversity versus those reporting low CFE adversity were 1.40 (0.98-2.11) and 1.25 (0.89-1.75), respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality was 1.68 (1.17-2.41) for those with high CFE adversity scores and 1.55 (1.11-2.17) for those with moderate CFE adversity scores.</p> <p>Conclusions</p> <p>Adverse CFE was associated with CVD incidence and all-cause mortality later in life, even after controlling for CVD risk factors in young adulthood.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/4215
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.source.pagese015326


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© 2020 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.  This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.