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dc.contributor.authorPino, Sam
dc.contributor.authorFang, Shih-Lieh
dc.contributor.authorBraverman, Lewis E.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:09:59.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:51:23Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:51:23Z
dc.date.issued1996-02-01
dc.date.submitted2008-06-18
dc.identifier.citationClin Chem. 1996 Feb;42(2):239-43.
dc.identifier.issn0009-9147 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid8595717
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/41847
dc.description.abstractThe chloric acid method is most commonly used to obtain accurate and reproducible measurements of iodine and remove interfering substances. Unfortunately chloric acid is a potential hazard, requiring an explosion-proof hood, among other precautions. We have developed a simple, convenient, and economic method for measuring urinary iodine by using 1 mol/L ammonium persulfate, a nonexplosive, nonhazardous chemical, as the oxidizing reagent. The oxidation procedure can be completed in 30 min at a temperature of 91-95 degrees C. The iodine in the urine is then measured by a modification of the traditional colorimetric method of Sandell and Kolthoff. Urine samples (110) collected from a mixed population of healthy males and females, ranging in age from 6 to 79 years and living in the US, were analyzed for urine iodine content by two methods: the proposed ammonium persulfate method and the chloric acid method. The ammonium persulfate method has an intraassay CV of 9.1% at 0.42 +/- 0.04 micromol/L (mean +/- SD), 7.8% at 1.46 +/- 0.11 micromol/L, and 4.0% at 3.54 +/- 0.14 micromol/L. The interassay CV is 10.2% at 0.46 +/- 0.05 micromol/L, and 7.9% at 3.27 +/- 0.26 micromol/L. Recovery of iodine added to urine in vitro was 107%, 94%, and 97% for 0.42 micromol/L, 0.77 micromol/L and 3.64 micromol/L, respectively. The lower limit of detectability was 0.0034 microgram of iodine. Values for iodine in 110 urines measured by the reference chloric acid method ranged from 0.06 to 8.03 micromol/L and by the ammonium persulfate method from 0.05 to 7.4 micromol/L. The persulfate method (y) correlated extremely closely with the reference chloric acid method (x) by the Pearson correlation (y = 0.923x + 0.810 micromol/L, and r = 0.994, Sy/x = 1.841).
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8595717&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.clinchem.org/cgi/reprint/42/2/239
dc.subject*Ammonium Sulfate
dc.subjectAutoanalysis
dc.subjectChlorates
dc.subjectColorimetry
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIndicators and Reagents
dc.subjectIodine
dc.subjectMale
dc.subject*Oxidants
dc.subjectReference Values
dc.subjectSafety
dc.subjectSensitivity and Specificity
dc.subjectLife Sciences
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleAmmonium persulfate: a safe alternative oxidizing reagent for measuring urinary iodine
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleClinical chemistry
dc.source.volume42
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/465
dc.identifier.contextkey533179
html.description.abstract<p>The chloric acid method is most commonly used to obtain accurate and reproducible measurements of iodine and remove interfering substances. Unfortunately chloric acid is a potential hazard, requiring an explosion-proof hood, among other precautions. We have developed a simple, convenient, and economic method for measuring urinary iodine by using 1 mol/L ammonium persulfate, a nonexplosive, nonhazardous chemical, as the oxidizing reagent. The oxidation procedure can be completed in 30 min at a temperature of 91-95 degrees C. The iodine in the urine is then measured by a modification of the traditional colorimetric method of Sandell and Kolthoff. Urine samples (110) collected from a mixed population of healthy males and females, ranging in age from 6 to 79 years and living in the US, were analyzed for urine iodine content by two methods: the proposed ammonium persulfate method and the chloric acid method. The ammonium persulfate method has an intraassay CV of 9.1% at 0.42 +/- 0.04 micromol/L (mean +/- SD), 7.8% at 1.46 +/- 0.11 micromol/L, and 4.0% at 3.54 +/- 0.14 micromol/L. The interassay CV is 10.2% at 0.46 +/- 0.05 micromol/L, and 7.9% at 3.27 +/- 0.26 micromol/L. Recovery of iodine added to urine in vitro was 107%, 94%, and 97% for 0.42 micromol/L, 0.77 micromol/L and 3.64 micromol/L, respectively. The lower limit of detectability was 0.0034 microgram of iodine. Values for iodine in 110 urines measured by the reference chloric acid method ranged from 0.06 to 8.03 micromol/L and by the ammonium persulfate method from 0.05 to 7.4 micromol/L. The persulfate method (y) correlated extremely closely with the reference chloric acid method (x) by the Pearson correlation (y = 0.923x + 0.810 micromol/L, and r = 0.994, Sy/x = 1.841).</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/465
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Endocrinology
dc.source.pages239-43


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