Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSmith, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.authorHammond, S. Katharine
dc.contributor.authorWong, Otto
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:02.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:53:01Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:53:01Z
dc.date.issued1993-12-01
dc.date.submitted2008-07-09
dc.identifier.citationEnviron Health Perspect. 1993 Dec;101 Suppl 6:13-21.
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765 (Print)
dc.identifier.pmid8020436
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/42178
dc.description.abstractPersonal exposures were estimated for a large cohort of workers in the U.S. domestic system for distributing gasoline by trucks and marine vessels. This assessment included development of a rationale and methodology for extrapolating vapor exposures prior to the availability of measurement data, analysis of existing measurement data to estimate task and job exposures during 1975-1985, and extrapolation of truck and marine job exposures before 1975. A worker's vapor exposure was extrapolated from three sets of factors: the tasks in his or her job associated with vapor sources, the characteristics of vapor sources (equipment and other facilities) at the work site, and the composition of petroleum products producing vapors. Historical data were collected on the tasks in job definitions, on work-site facilities, and on product composition. These data were used in a model to estimate the overall time-weighted-average vapor exposure for jobs based on estimates of task exposures and their duration. Task exposures were highest during tank filling in trucks and marine vessels. Measured average annual, full-shift exposures during 1975-1985 ranged from 9 to 14 ppm of total hydrocarbon vapor for truck drivers and 2 to 35 ppm for marine workers on inland waterways. Extrapolated past average exposures in truck operations were highest for truck drivers before 1965 (range 140-220 ppm). Other jobs in truck operations resulted in much lower exposures. Because there were few changes in marine operations before 1979, exposures were assumed to be the same as those measured during 1975-1985. Well-defined exposure gradients were found across jobs within time periods, which were suitable for epidemiologic analyses.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=8020436&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.subjectDose-Response Relationship, Drug
dc.subjectGasoline
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectOccupational Diseases
dc.subject*Occupational Exposure
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.titleHealth effects of gasoline exposure. I. Exposure assessment for U.S. distribution workers
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEnvironmental health perspectives
dc.source.volume101 Suppl 6
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1548&amp;context=oapubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/oapubs/549
dc.identifier.contextkey545031
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:53:01Z
html.description.abstract<p>Personal exposures were estimated for a large cohort of workers in the U.S. domestic system for distributing gasoline by trucks and marine vessels. This assessment included development of a rationale and methodology for extrapolating vapor exposures prior to the availability of measurement data, analysis of existing measurement data to estimate task and job exposures during 1975-1985, and extrapolation of truck and marine job exposures before 1975. A worker's vapor exposure was extrapolated from three sets of factors: the tasks in his or her job associated with vapor sources, the characteristics of vapor sources (equipment and other facilities) at the work site, and the composition of petroleum products producing vapors. Historical data were collected on the tasks in job definitions, on work-site facilities, and on product composition. These data were used in a model to estimate the overall time-weighted-average vapor exposure for jobs based on estimates of task exposures and their duration. Task exposures were highest during tank filling in trucks and marine vessels. Measured average annual, full-shift exposures during 1975-1985 ranged from 9 to 14 ppm of total hydrocarbon vapor for truck drivers and 2 to 35 ppm for marine workers on inland waterways. Extrapolated past average exposures in truck operations were highest for truck drivers before 1965 (range 140-220 ppm). Other jobs in truck operations resulted in much lower exposures. Because there were few changes in marine operations before 1979, exposures were assumed to be the same as those measured during 1975-1985. Well-defined exposure gradients were found across jobs within time periods, which were suitable for epidemiologic analyses.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathoapubs/549
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family and Community Medicine
dc.source.pages13-21


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
8020436.pdf
Size:
1.728Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record