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dc.contributor.authorXu, Jianwen
dc.contributor.authorFilion, Tera M.
dc.contributor.authorPrifti, Fioleda
dc.contributor.authorSong, Jie
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:08.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:56:37Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:56:37Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-01
dc.date.submitted2014-08-13
dc.identifier.citationChem Asian J. 2011 Oct 4;6(10):2730-7. doi: 10.1002/asia.201100411. Epub 2011 Aug 24. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asia.201100411">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1861-471X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asia.201100411
dc.identifier.pmid21954076
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/42969
dc.description.abstractStrategies to encapsulate cells in cytocompatible three-dimensional hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties and degradability without harmful gelling conditions are highly desired for regenerative medicine applications. Here we reported a method for preparing poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polycarbonate hydrogels through copper-free, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) click chemistry. Hydrogels with varying mechanical properties were formed by "clicking" azido-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polycarbonate macromers with dibenzocyclooctyne-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) under physiological conditions within minutes. Bone marrow stromal cells encapsulated in these gels exhibited higher cellular viability than those encapsulated in photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate. The precise control over the macromer compositions, cytocompatible SPAAC cross-linking, and the degradability of the polycarbonate segments make these hydrogels promising candidates for scaffold and stem cell assisted tissue repair and regeneration.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21954076&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3689886/pdf/nihms440243.pdf
dc.subjectAlkynes
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectAzides
dc.subjectBiocompatible Materials
dc.subjectBone Marrow Cells
dc.subjectCell Survival
dc.subject*Click Chemistry
dc.subjectCyclization
dc.subjectHeterocyclic Compounds, 3-Ring
dc.subjectHydrogels
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMolecular Structure
dc.subjectPolyethylene Glycols
dc.subjectRats
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology
dc.subjectCell and Developmental Biology
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciences
dc.titleCytocompatible poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polycarbonate hydrogels cross-linked by copper-free, strain-promoted click chemistry
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleChemistry, an Asian journal
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.issue10
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/ortho_pp/172
dc.identifier.contextkey5959067
html.description.abstract<p>Strategies to encapsulate cells in cytocompatible three-dimensional hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties and degradability without harmful gelling conditions are highly desired for regenerative medicine applications. Here we reported a method for preparing poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polycarbonate hydrogels through copper-free, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) click chemistry. Hydrogels with varying mechanical properties were formed by "clicking" azido-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polycarbonate macromers with dibenzocyclooctyne-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) under physiological conditions within minutes. Bone marrow stromal cells encapsulated in these gels exhibited higher cellular viability than those encapsulated in photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate. The precise control over the macromer compositions, cytocompatible SPAAC cross-linking, and the degradability of the polycarbonate segments make these hydrogels promising candidates for scaffold and stem cell assisted tissue repair and regeneration.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathortho_pp/172
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopedics and Physical Rehabilitation
dc.source.pages2730-7


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