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dc.contributor.authorNwosu, Benjamin U.
dc.contributor.authorMaranda, Louise S.
dc.contributor.authorCandela, Ninfa
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:09.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:57:16Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:57:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-29
dc.date.submitted2016-11-03
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/M27P4Q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43105
dc.description<p>Explanation of codes is included in dataset file. Data collection dates: August 2008 - August 2016.</p>
dc.description<p>Methodology is documented in manuscript.</p>
dc.description.abstractManuscript abstract: IMPORTANCE: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with significant morbidity in children and adolescents, and the therapeutic efficacy of available treatment options is limited. The role of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric IBS is unclear as the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS is unknown. Equally, the relationship of vitamin D status with psychosomatic symptoms in children and adolescents is unclear. AIM: To characterize the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS using a case-control study design. HYPOTHESIS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration will be similar between patients with IBS and controls. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-controlled study of 116 controls (age 14.6 ± 4.3 y), female (n = 67; 58%) and 55 subjects with IBS (age 16.5 ± 3.1y), female (n = 44; 80%). Overweight was defined as BMI of ≥85th butpercentile, and obesity as BMI ≥95th percentile. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D of/L, while seasons of vitamin D draw were categorized as summer, winter, spring, and fall. Major psychosomatic manifestations included in the analysis were depression, anxiety, and migraine. RESULTS: More than 50% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of/L (53% vs. 27%, p = 0.001); and >90% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of/L (93% vs. 75%, p = 0.006). IBS subjects had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D: 53.2 ± 15.8 nmol/L vs. 65.2 ± 28.0 nmol/L, p = 0.003; and albumin: 6.2 ± 0.6 vs. 6.5 ± 0.6 μmol/L, p = 0.0.01. IBS subjects with migraine had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls (p = 0.01). BMI z-score was similar between the controls and IBS subjects (0.5 ± 1.4 vs. 1.2 ± 2.9, p = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients with IBS had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls despite having similar mean BMI values as controls. Only 7% of the children and adolescents with IBS were vitamin D sufficient, and >50% of the subjects with IBS had vitamin D deficiency. This is a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency compared to IBD and other malabsorption syndromes. Monitoring for vitamin D deficiency should be part of the routine care for patients with IBS. Randomized control trials are warranted to determine the role of adjunctive vitamin D therapy in pediatric IBS.
dc.format.medium.xlsx (72 KB)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publishereScholarship@UMMS
dc.relation<p>This dataset is the primary data source for the following published study: Nwosu BU, Maranda L, Candela N. <a href="http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_endocrinology/60/" target="_blank" title="Vitamin D status in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome">Vitamin D status in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome</a>. PLoS One. 2017 Feb 13;12(2):e0172183. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172183. PubMed PMID: 28192499.</p>
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectirritable bowel syndrome
dc.subjectIBS
dc.subjectpediatric
dc.subjectvitamin D
dc.subjectsupplementation
dc.subjectDigestive System Diseases
dc.subjectEndocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
dc.subjectGastroenterology
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleData from: Vitamin D Status in Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome
dc.typeDataset
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/pediatrics_data/4
dc.identifier.contextkey9342334
dc.file.descriptionDataset in csv format
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-31T00:31:45Z
html.description.abstract<p>Manuscript abstract:</p> <p>IMPORTANCE: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with significant morbidity in children and adolescents, and the therapeutic efficacy of available treatment options is limited. The role of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric IBS is unclear as the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS is unknown. Equally, the relationship of vitamin D status with psychosomatic symptoms in children and adolescents is unclear.</p> <p>AIM: To characterize the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS using a case-control study design.</p> <p>HYPOTHESIS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration will be similar between patients with IBS and controls.</p> <p>SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-controlled study of 116 controls (age 14.6 ± 4.3 y), female (n = 67; 58%) and 55 subjects with IBS (age 16.5 ± 3.1y), female (n = 44; 80%). Overweight was defined as BMI of ≥85th butpercentile, and obesity as BMI ≥95th percentile. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D of/L, while seasons of vitamin D draw were categorized as summer, winter, spring, and fall. Major psychosomatic manifestations included in the analysis were depression, anxiety, and migraine.</p> <p>RESULTS: More than 50% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of/L (53% vs. 27%, p = 0.001); and >90% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of/L (93% vs. 75%, p = 0.006). IBS subjects had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D: 53.2 ± 15.8 nmol/L vs. 65.2 ± 28.0 nmol/L, p = 0.003; and albumin: 6.2 ± 0.6 vs. 6.5 ± 0.6 μmol/L, p = 0.0.01. IBS subjects with migraine had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls (p = 0.01). BMI z-score was similar between the controls and IBS subjects (0.5 ± 1.4 vs. 1.2 ± 2.9, p = 0.11).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients with IBS had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls despite having similar mean BMI values as controls. Only 7% of the children and adolescents with IBS were vitamin D sufficient, and >50% of the subjects with IBS had vitamin D deficiency. This is a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency compared to IBD and other malabsorption syndromes. Monitoring for vitamin D deficiency should be part of the routine care for patients with IBS. Randomized control trials are warranted to determine the role of adjunctive vitamin D therapy in pediatric IBS.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpediatrics_data/4
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics


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