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dc.contributor.authorNwosu, Benjamin U.
dc.contributor.authorKum-Nji, Philip
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:09.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:57:17Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:57:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-26
dc.date.submitted2018-06-29
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/M2GT2H
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43108
dc.description<p>Data collection dates: 2009-2010. Methodology is documented in manuscript.</p>
dc.description.abstractManuscript abstract: IMPORTANCE: The role of tobacco-smoke exposure on serum vitamin D concentration in US pediatric population is not known. We hypothesized that tobacco smoke exposure would increase the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in US children. METHODS: Representative national data were accessed from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 databank on 2,263 subjects of ages 3 to 17 years. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on their age: children, ifyears; and youth if 10 to 17 years. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the effect of serum cotinine-verified tobacco smoke exposure on vitamin D status after controlling for key sociodemographic confounders. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D/mL, insufficiency as 25(OH)D of 20-29.9 ng/mL, and sufficiency as 25(OH)D of ≥30 ng/mL. Tobacco smoke exposure status was defined by serum cotinine concentration as follows: unexposed and non-smoking ( RESULTS: The prevalence of second-hand smoke exposure was 42.0% (95%CI, 36.7%-47.5%); while the prevalence of active smoking among teenagers was 9.0% (95%CI, 6.2%-12.5%). Vitamin D deficiency occurred at a frequency of 15.1% in children unexposed to tobacco smoke, 20.9% in children exposed to passive tobacco smoke, and 18.0% among actively smoking youth (p CONCLUSIONS: This analysis of a nationwide database reports that tobacco smoke exposure is an independent predictor of vitamin D deficiency in US children.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors received no specific funding for this work.
dc.format.medium.xlsx (884 KB)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publishereScholarship@UMMS
dc.relation<p>This dataset is the primary data source for the following published study: Nwosu BU, Kum-Nji P. <a href="https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_endocrinology/63/" target="_blank">Tobacco smoke exposure is an independent predictor of vitamin D deficiency in US children</a>. PLoS One. 2018 Oct 8;13(10):e0205342. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0205342. eCollection 2018. PubMed PMID: 30296288.</p>
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecttobacco smoke exposure
dc.subjectvitamin D
dc.subjectchildren
dc.subjectpredictor
dc.subjectNHANES
dc.subjectNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
dc.subjectEndocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
dc.subjectEnvironmental Public Health
dc.subjectNutritional and Metabolic Diseases
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleData from: Tobacco smoke exposure is an independent predictor of vitamin D deficiency in US children
dc.typeDataset
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/pediatrics_data/7
dc.identifier.contextkey12418548
dc.file.descriptionDataset in csv format
dc.file.descriptionExplanation of codes used in dataset
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-31T00:36:32Z
html.description.abstract<p>Manuscript abstract: <h4>IMPORTANCE:</h4></p> <p>The role of tobacco-smoke exposure on serum vitamin D concentration in US pediatric population is not known. We hypothesized that tobacco smoke exposure would increase the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in US children. <h4>METHODS:</h4></p> <p>Representative national data were accessed from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 databank on 2,263 subjects of ages 3 to 17 years. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on their age: children, ifyears; and youth if 10 to 17 years. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the effect of serum cotinine-verified tobacco smoke exposure on vitamin D status after controlling for key sociodemographic confounders. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D/mL, insufficiency as 25(OH)D of 20-29.9 ng/mL, and sufficiency as 25(OH)D of ≥30 ng/mL. Tobacco smoke exposure status was defined by serum cotinine concentration as follows: unexposed and non-smoking ( <h4>RESULTS:</h4></p> <p>The prevalence of second-hand smoke exposure was 42.0% (95%CI, 36.7%-47.5%); while the prevalence of active smoking among teenagers was 9.0% (95%CI, 6.2%-12.5%). Vitamin D deficiency occurred at a frequency of 15.1% in children unexposed to tobacco smoke, 20.9% in children exposed to passive tobacco smoke, and 18.0% among actively smoking youth (p <h4>CONCLUSIONS:</h4></p> <p>This analysis of a nationwide database reports that tobacco smoke exposure is an independent predictor of vitamin D deficiency in US children.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpediatrics_data/7
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics


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