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dc.contributor.authorNwosu, Benjamin U.
dc.contributor.authorMaranda, Louise
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Rosalie
dc.contributor.authorColocino, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorFlores, Carlos D.
dc.contributor.authorFolkman, Kerry
dc.contributor.authorGroblewski, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorRuze, Patricia
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:09.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:57:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:57:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-05
dc.date.submitted2014-03-10
dc.identifier.citation<p>Nwosu BU, Maranda L, Berry R, Colocino B, Flores Sr. CD, et al. (2014) The Vitamin D Status of Prison Inmates. PLoS ONE 9(3): e90623. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090623. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090623" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's website</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0090623
dc.identifier.pmid24598840
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43220
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: There is no comprehensive, systematic analysis of the vitamin D status of prisoners in the scientific literature. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the vitamin D status and its determinants in US prison inmates. HYPOTHESIS: Given the uniformity of dietary intake amongst inmates, vitamin D status will be determined by non-dietary factors such as skin pigmentation, security level-, and the duration of incarceration. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of 526 inmates (males, n = 502, age 48.6±12.5 years; females, n = 24, age 44.1±12.2) in Massachusetts prisons. Vitamin D sufficiency, insufficiency, and deficiency were respectively defined as a 25(OH)D concentration 75 nmol/L; 50 to 75 nmol/L; and/L. The Massachusetts Department of Correction Statement of Nutritional Adequacy stated that each inmate received the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D daily. Security level of incarceration was designated as minimum, medium, and maximum. Racial groups were categorized as Black, white, Asian, and Others. RESULTS: Serum 25(OH)D levels peaked in summer and autumn, and decreased in winter and spring. Vitamin D deficiency occurred in 50.5% of blacks, 29.3% of whites, and 14.3% of Asian inmates (p = 0.007). Black inmates had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D level than white inmates at the maximum security level (p = 0.015), medium security level (p = 0.001), but not at the minimum security level (p = 0.40). After adjusting for covariates black inmates at a maximum security level had a four-fold higher risk for vitamin D deficiency than white inmates at the same security level (OR 3.9 [95% CI 1.3-11.7]. CONCLUSIONS: The vitamin D status of prison inmates is determined by skin pigmentation, seasons, and the security level of incarceration.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=24598840&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.rights<p>Copyright 2014 Nwosu et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.</p>
dc.subjectVitamin D
dc.subjectDietetics and Clinical Nutrition
dc.subjectEndocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
dc.subjectPublic Health
dc.titleThe Vitamin D Status of Prison Inmates
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS One
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1043&amp;context=peds_endocrinology&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_endocrinology/44
dc.identifier.contextkey5311585
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T16:57:46Z
html.description.abstract<p>INTRODUCTION: There is no comprehensive, systematic analysis of the vitamin D status of prisoners in the scientific literature.</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: To investigate the vitamin D status and its determinants in US prison inmates.</p> <p>HYPOTHESIS: Given the uniformity of dietary intake amongst inmates, vitamin D status will be determined by non-dietary factors such as skin pigmentation, security level-, and the duration of incarceration.</p> <p>SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of 526 inmates (males, n = 502, age 48.6±12.5 years; females, n = 24, age 44.1±12.2) in Massachusetts prisons. Vitamin D sufficiency, insufficiency, and deficiency were respectively defined as a 25(OH)D concentration 75 nmol/L; 50 to 75 nmol/L; and/L. The Massachusetts Department of Correction Statement of Nutritional Adequacy stated that each inmate received the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D daily. Security level of incarceration was designated as minimum, medium, and maximum. Racial groups were categorized as Black, white, Asian, and Others.</p> <p>RESULTS: Serum 25(OH)D levels peaked in summer and autumn, and decreased in winter and spring. Vitamin D deficiency occurred in 50.5% of blacks, 29.3% of whites, and 14.3% of Asian inmates (p = 0.007). Black inmates had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D level than white inmates at the maximum security level (p = 0.015), medium security level (p = 0.001), but not at the minimum security level (p = 0.40). After adjusting for covariates black inmates at a maximum security level had a four-fold higher risk for vitamin D deficiency than white inmates at the same security level (OR 3.9 [95% CI 1.3-11.7].</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The vitamin D status of prison inmates is determined by skin pigmentation, seasons, and the security level of incarceration.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpeds_endocrinology/44
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology
dc.source.pagese90623


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