Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcQuilkin, Patricia A.
dc.contributor.authorNiescierenko, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorBeddoe, Ann Marie
dc.contributor.authorGoentzel, Jarod
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Elinor A.
dc.contributor.authorHenwood, Patricia C.
dc.contributor.authorRehwaldt, Lise
dc.contributor.authorTeklu, Sisay
dc.contributor.authorTupesis, Janis
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Roseda
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:13.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:59:34Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-01
dc.date.submitted2017-11-27
dc.identifier.citationAcad Med. 2017 Dec;92(12):1674-1679. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001959. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001959">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1040-2446 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/ACM.0000000000001959
dc.identifier.pmid29019800
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43616
dc.description.abstractDuring the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa (2014-2016), many faculty, staff, and trainees from U.S. academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals and their affiliated medical schools; AMCs) wished to contribute to the response to the outbreak, but many barriers prevented their participation. Here, the authors describe a successful long-term academic collaboration in Liberia that facilitated participation in the EVD response. This Perspective outlines the role the authors played in the response (providing equipment and training, supporting the return of medical education), the barriers they faced (logistical and financial), and elements that contributed to their success (partnering and coordinating their response with both U.S. and African institutions). There is a paucity of literature discussing the role of AMCs in disaster response, so the authors discuss the lessons learned and offer suggestions about the responsibilities that AMCs have and the roles they can play in responding to disaster situations.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=29019800&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001959
dc.subjectdisaster medicine
dc.subjectdisaster response
dc.subjectacademic medical centers
dc.subjectEbola virus disease
dc.subjectepidemic
dc.subjectacademic collaboration
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectInternational Public Health
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titleAcademic Medical Support to the Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak in Liberia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAcademic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
dc.source.volume92
dc.source.issue12
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_pp/188
dc.identifier.contextkey11154104
html.description.abstract<p>During the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa (2014-2016), many faculty, staff, and trainees from U.S. academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals and their affiliated medical schools; AMCs) wished to contribute to the response to the outbreak, but many barriers prevented their participation. Here, the authors describe a successful long-term academic collaboration in Liberia that facilitated participation in the EVD response. This Perspective outlines the role the authors played in the response (providing equipment and training, supporting the return of medical education), the barriers they faced (logistical and financial), and elements that contributed to their success (partnering and coordinating their response with both U.S. and African institutions). There is a paucity of literature discussing the role of AMCs in disaster response, so the authors discuss the lessons learned and offer suggestions about the responsibilities that AMCs have and the roles they can play in responding to disaster situations.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpeds_pp/188
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics
dc.source.pages1674-1679


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record