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dc.contributor.authorPudney, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorWangu, Zoon
dc.contributor.authorPanther, Lori
dc.contributor.authorFugelso, Dana
dc.contributor.authorMarathe, Jai
dc.contributor.authorSagar, Manish
dc.contributor.authorPolitch, Joseph A.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Deborah J.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:13.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T16:59:46Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T16:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-07
dc.date.submitted2018-12-21
dc.identifier.citation<p>J Infect Dis. 2019 Jan 7;219(2):275-283. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy505. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiy505">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiy505
dc.identifier.pmid30137482
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43662
dc.description.abstractBackground: Condylomata acuminata [anogenital warts (AGW)] are prevalent in HIV-infected individuals and sexually active populations at risk for HIV acquisition, and have been associated with HIV transmission. We compared AGW to control tissue for abundance, types and location of HIV-target cells, and for susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro, to provide biological evidence that AGW facilitate HIV transmission. Methods: We used immunohistology to identify HIV-target cells in AGW and control skin. We also inoculated AGW and control tissue from HIV-negative men with HIV in vitro, and assessed infection by TZM-bl and p24 assays. Results: CD1a+ dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells and macrophages were significantly more abundant in the epidermis of AGW than control tissue. These HIV target cells also often appeared in large focal accumulations in the dermis of AGW. Two out of 8 AGW vs. 0 of 8 control tissues showed robust infection with HIV in vitro. Conclusions: Compared to normal skin, AGW contain significantly higher concentrations of HIV-target cells that may be susceptible to HIV infection. Condylomata may thus promote HIV transmission, especially in the setting of typical lesion vascularity and friability. Prevention or treatment of AGW may decrease the sexual transmission of HIV.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30137482&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiy505
dc.subjectCondylomata acuminata
dc.subjectanogenital warts
dc.subjectHPV
dc.subjectHIV
dc.subjectlymphocytes
dc.subjectdendritic cells
dc.subjecthiv
dc.subjectdermis epidermis
dc.subjectgenital warts
dc.subjectdendritic cells
dc.subjectlymphocytes
dc.subjectmacrophages
dc.subjectt-lymphocyte
dc.subjectskin leptocytes
dc.subjectHIV infections
dc.subjectHIV transmission
dc.subjecttissue specimen
dc.subjectImmunology and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectSkin and Connective Tissue Diseases
dc.subjectVirus Diseases
dc.titleCondylomata acuminata (anogenital warts) contain accumulations of HIV-1 target cells that may provide portals for HIV transmission
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of infectious diseases
dc.source.volume219
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_pp/238
dc.identifier.contextkey13525453
html.description.abstract<p>Background: Condylomata acuminata [anogenital warts (AGW)] are prevalent in HIV-infected individuals and sexually active populations at risk for HIV acquisition, and have been associated with HIV transmission. We compared AGW to control tissue for abundance, types and location of HIV-target cells, and for susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro, to provide biological evidence that AGW facilitate HIV transmission.</p> <p>Methods: We used immunohistology to identify HIV-target cells in AGW and control skin. We also inoculated AGW and control tissue from HIV-negative men with HIV in vitro, and assessed infection by TZM-bl and p24 assays.</p> <p>Results: CD1a+ dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells and macrophages were significantly more abundant in the epidermis of AGW than control tissue. These HIV target cells also often appeared in large focal accumulations in the dermis of AGW. Two out of 8 AGW vs. 0 of 8 control tissues showed robust infection with HIV in vitro.</p> <p>Conclusions: Compared to normal skin, AGW contain significantly higher concentrations of HIV-target cells that may be susceptible to HIV infection. Condylomata may thus promote HIV transmission, especially in the setting of typical lesion vascularity and friability. Prevention or treatment of AGW may decrease the sexual transmission of HIV.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpeds_pp/238
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases
dc.source.pages275-283


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