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dc.contributor.authorBlake, Diane R.
dc.contributor.authorLemay, Celeste
dc.contributor.authorMaranda, Louise
dc.contributor.authorFortenberry, J. Dennis
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Margaret H.
dc.contributor.authorMazor, Kathleen M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:13.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:00:10Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-01
dc.date.submitted2016-11-07
dc.identifier.citationAIDS Care. 2015;27(8):1005-13. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2015.1024096. Epub 2015 Mar 24. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2015.1024096">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0954-0121 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09540121.2015.1024096
dc.identifier.pmid25803694
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43738
dc.description.abstractHIV vaccine trials with minors will likely require parental permission and informed assent from adolescents. For this to be a valid process, the information needs to be presented in a manner that promotes adolescent comprehension. Previous studies suggest that adolescent comprehension of assent is often insufficient. We developed an interactive web-based assent that included interspersed quiz questions for a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial. Efficacy of the web-based assent was compared to a standard paper assent with and without interspersed questions. One hundred twenty teen participants, ages 15-17 years, from five community organizations were randomized to self-administered web-based assent (n=60) or investigator-administered paper assent with (n=29) or without (n=31) interspersed quiz questions. After reviewing the assent, participants completed a 27-item comprehension test. Comprehension scores were compared between groups. The mean number of correctly answered questions were 21.2 for the full paper group and 21.1 for the web-based group (t118=-0.08, p=0.94). Scores were 20.2 for the paper without interspersed questions sub-group and 22.1 for the paper with interspersed questions sub-group (t58=1.96, p=0.055). Participants in the web-based group performed as well on the comprehension test as those in the paper group, and those in the paper with questions sub-group performed better than those in the paper without questions sub-group, suggesting that interspersed quiz questions may improve understanding of a traditional paper assent. The minimal investigator time and standardized administration of the web-based assent as well as ability to tailor the assent discussion to topics identified by incorrect comprehension test responses are advantages worthy of further investigation.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=25803694&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425609/
dc.subjectInfectious Disease
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.titleDevelopment and evaluation of a web-based assent for adolescents considering an HIV vaccine trial
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAIDS care
dc.source.volume27
dc.source.issue8
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/peds_pp/51
dc.identifier.contextkey9353393
html.description.abstract<p>HIV vaccine trials with minors will likely require parental permission and informed assent from adolescents. For this to be a valid process, the information needs to be presented in a manner that promotes adolescent comprehension. Previous studies suggest that adolescent comprehension of assent is often insufficient. We developed an interactive web-based assent that included interspersed quiz questions for a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial. Efficacy of the web-based assent was compared to a standard paper assent with and without interspersed questions. One hundred twenty teen participants, ages 15-17 years, from five community organizations were randomized to self-administered web-based assent (n=60) or investigator-administered paper assent with (n=29) or without (n=31) interspersed quiz questions. After reviewing the assent, participants completed a 27-item comprehension test. Comprehension scores were compared between groups. The mean number of correctly answered questions were 21.2 for the full paper group and 21.1 for the web-based group (t118=-0.08, p=0.94). Scores were 20.2 for the paper without interspersed questions sub-group and 22.1 for the paper with interspersed questions sub-group (t58=1.96, p=0.055). Participants in the web-based group performed as well on the comprehension test as those in the paper group, and those in the paper with questions sub-group performed better than those in the paper without questions sub-group, suggesting that interspersed quiz questions may improve understanding of a traditional paper assent. The minimal investigator time and standardized administration of the web-based assent as well as ability to tailor the assent discussion to topics identified by incorrect comprehension test responses are advantages worthy of further investigation.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpeds_pp/51
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Quantitative Health Sciences
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopedics and Physical Rehabilitation
dc.contributor.departmentMeyers Primary Care Institute
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine
dc.source.pages1005-13


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