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dc.contributor.authorBrady, Siobhan M.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lifang
dc.contributor.authorMegraw, Molly
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Natalia Julia
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Eric
dc.contributor.authorYi, Charles S.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Weilin
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Anna
dc.contributor.authorTaylor-Teeples, Mallorie
dc.contributor.authorKim, Dahae
dc.contributor.authorAhnert, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorOhler, Uwe
dc.contributor.authorWare, Doreen
dc.contributor.authorWalhout, Albertha J. M.
dc.contributor.authorBenfey, Philip N.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:15.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:01:13Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:01:13Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-18
dc.date.submitted2011-08-01
dc.identifier.citationMol Syst Biol. 2011 Jan 18;7:459. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/msb.2010.114">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1744-4292 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/msb.2010.114
dc.identifier.pmid21245844
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/43959
dc.description.abstractTightly controlled gene expression is a hallmark of multicellular development and is accomplished by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Although many studies have focused on identifying downstream targets of these molecules, less is known about the factors that regulate their differential expression. We used data from high spatial resolution gene expression experiments and yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) and two-hybrid (Y2H) assays to delineate a subset of interactions occurring within a gene regulatory network (GRN) that determines tissue-specific TF and miRNA expression in plants. We find that upstream TFs are expressed in more diverse cell types than their targets and that promoters that are bound by a relatively large number of TFs correspond to key developmental regulators. The regulatory consequence of many TFs for their target was experimentally determined using genetic analysis. Remarkably, molecular phenotypes were identified for 65% of the TFs, but morphological phenotypes were associated with only 16%. This indicates that the GRN is robust, and that gene expression changes may be canalized or buffered.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=21245844&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3.0 Unported License, which allows readers to alter, transform, or build upon the article and then distribute the resulting work under the same or similar license to this one. The work must be attributed back to the original author and commercial use is not permitted without specific permission.
dc.subjectArabidopsis
dc.subjectArabidopsis Proteins
dc.subjectGene Expression Profiling
dc.subjectGene Regulatory Networks
dc.subjectMicroRNAs
dc.subjectPlant Roots
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectSystems Biology
dc.subjectTranscription Factors
dc.subjectTwo-Hybrid System Techniques
dc.subjectGenetics and Genomics
dc.titleA stele-enriched gene regulatory network in the Arabidopsis root
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMolecular systems biology
dc.source.volume7
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1170&amp;context=pgfe_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/pgfe_pp/170
dc.identifier.contextkey2125610
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:01:13Z
html.description.abstract<p>Tightly controlled gene expression is a hallmark of multicellular development and is accomplished by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Although many studies have focused on identifying downstream targets of these molecules, less is known about the factors that regulate their differential expression. We used data from high spatial resolution gene expression experiments and yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) and two-hybrid (Y2H) assays to delineate a subset of interactions occurring within a gene regulatory network (GRN) that determines tissue-specific TF and miRNA expression in plants. We find that upstream TFs are expressed in more diverse cell types than their targets and that promoters that are bound by a relatively large number of TFs correspond to key developmental regulators. The regulatory consequence of many TFs for their target was experimentally determined using genetic analysis. Remarkably, molecular phenotypes were identified for 65% of the TFs, but morphological phenotypes were associated with only 16%. This indicates that the GRN is robust, and that gene expression changes may be canalized or buffered.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpgfe_pp/170
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Gene Function and Expression
dc.source.pages459


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