Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEhrhardt, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorCui, Jinrui
dc.contributor.authorDagdeviren, Sezin
dc.contributor.authorSaengnipanthkul, Suchaorn
dc.contributor.authorGoodridge, Helen S.
dc.contributor.authorKim, Jason K.
dc.contributor.authorLantier, Louise
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Xiuqing
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yii-Der I.
dc.contributor.authorRaffel, Leslie J.
dc.contributor.authorBuchanan, Thomas A.
dc.contributor.authorHsueh, Willa A.
dc.contributor.authorRotter, Jerome I.
dc.contributor.authorGoodarzi, Mark O.
dc.contributor.authorPeterfy, Miklos
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:17.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:03:16Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:03:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-01
dc.date.submitted2019-07-18
dc.identifier.citation<p>Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 Mar;27(3):434-443. doi: 10.1002/oby.22418. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22418">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/oby.22418
dc.identifier.pmid30801985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44389
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Aging is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether aging-associated insulin resistance is due to increased adiposity or other age-related factors. To address this question, the impact of aging on insulin sensitivity was investigated independently of changes in body composition. METHODS: Cohorts of mice aged 4 to 8 months ("young") and 18 to 27 months ("aged") exhibiting similar body composition were characterized for glucose metabolism on chow and high-fat diets. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses. The relationship between aging and insulin resistance in humans was investigated in 1,250 nondiabetic Mexican Americans who underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. RESULTS: In mice with similar body composition, age had no detrimental effect on plasma glucose and insulin levels. While aging did not diminish glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps demonstrated impaired insulin sensitivity and reduced insulin clearance in aged mice on chow and high-fat diets. Consistent with results in the mouse, age remained an independent determinant of insulin resistance after adjustment for body composition in Mexican American males. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that in addition to altered body composition, adiposity-independent mechanisms also contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance in mice and humans.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=30801985&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22418
dc.subjectCellular and Molecular Physiology
dc.subjectEndocrinology
dc.subjectHormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists
dc.subjectLipids
dc.subjectNutritional and Metabolic Diseases
dc.titleAdiposity-Independent Effects of Aging on Insulin Sensitivity and Clearance in Mice and Humans
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleObesity (Silver Spring, Md.)
dc.source.volume27
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/pmm_pp/118
dc.identifier.contextkey14954530
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: Aging is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether aging-associated insulin resistance is due to increased adiposity or other age-related factors. To address this question, the impact of aging on insulin sensitivity was investigated independently of changes in body composition.</p> <p>METHODS: Cohorts of mice aged 4 to 8 months ("young") and 18 to 27 months ("aged") exhibiting similar body composition were characterized for glucose metabolism on chow and high-fat diets. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses. The relationship between aging and insulin resistance in humans was investigated in 1,250 nondiabetic Mexican Americans who underwent hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps.</p> <p>RESULTS: In mice with similar body composition, age had no detrimental effect on plasma glucose and insulin levels. While aging did not diminish glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps demonstrated impaired insulin sensitivity and reduced insulin clearance in aged mice on chow and high-fat diets. Consistent with results in the mouse, age remained an independent determinant of insulin resistance after adjustment for body composition in Mexican American males.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that in addition to altered body composition, adiposity-independent mechanisms also contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance in mice and humans.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpmm_pp/118
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicine
dc.source.pages434-443


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record