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dc.contributor.authorUS Preventive Services Task Force
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Douglas K.
dc.contributor.authorPbert, Lori
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:19.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:04:00Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:04:00Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-06
dc.date.submitted2019-09-23
dc.identifier.citation<p>JAMA. 2019 Aug 6;322(5):438-444. doi: 10.1001/jama.2019.10232. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.10232">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.2019.10232
dc.identifier.pmid31386141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44549
dc.description<p>Full author list omitted for brevity. For the full list of authors, see article.</p>
dc.description.abstractImportance: Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon cancer with an age-adjusted annual incidence of 12.9 cases per 100000 person-years. However, the death rate is 11.0 deaths per 100000 person-years because the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is poor. Although its incidence is low, pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Because of the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer, along with improvements in early detection and treatment of other types of cancer, it is estimated that pancreatic cancer may soon become the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Objective: To update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for pancreatic cancer. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for pancreatic cancer, the diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for pancreatic cancer, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer. Findings: The USPSTF found no evidence that screening for pancreatic cancer or treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer improves disease-specific morbidity or mortality, or all-cause mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults can be bounded as no greater than small. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the harms of screening for pancreatic cancer and treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer can be bounded as at least moderate. The USPSTF reaffirms its previous conclusion that the potential benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults do not outweigh the potential harms. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults. (D recommendation).
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=31386141&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.10232
dc.rights© 2019 American Medical Association. Publisher PDF posted after 6 months as allowed by the publisher's author rights policy at https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/pages/instructions-for-authors#SecDepositingResearchArticlesinApprovedPublicRepositories.
dc.subjectpancreatic cancer
dc.subjectscreening
dc.subjectprevention
dc.subjectrecommendations
dc.subjectBehavioral Medicine
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectDigestive System Diseases
dc.subjectHealth Services Administration
dc.subjectNeoplasms
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPublic Health Education and Promotion
dc.titleScreening for Pancreatic Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJAMA
dc.source.volume322
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1143&amp;context=prc_pubs&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prc_pubs/143
dc.legacy.embargo2020-02-06T00:00:00-08:00
dc.identifier.contextkey15399967
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:04:01Z
html.description.abstract<p>Importance: Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon cancer with an age-adjusted annual incidence of 12.9 cases per 100000 person-years. However, the death rate is 11.0 deaths per 100000 person-years because the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is poor. Although its incidence is low, pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Because of the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer, along with improvements in early detection and treatment of other types of cancer, it is estimated that pancreatic cancer may soon become the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States.</p> <p>Objective: To update the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for pancreatic cancer.</p> <p>Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for pancreatic cancer, the diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for pancreatic cancer, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer.</p> <p>Findings: The USPSTF found no evidence that screening for pancreatic cancer or treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer improves disease-specific morbidity or mortality, or all-cause mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults can be bounded as no greater than small. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the magnitude of the harms of screening for pancreatic cancer and treatment of screen-detected pancreatic cancer can be bounded as at least moderate. The USPSTF reaffirms its previous conclusion that the potential benefits of screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults do not outweigh the potential harms.</p> <p>Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults. (D recommendation).</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprc_pubs/143
dc.contributor.departmentUMass Worcester Prevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Sciences, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages438-444


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