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dc.contributor.authorMoore Simas, Tiffany A.
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorNuss, Emily
dc.contributor.authorMarieni, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, Bess
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorChasan-Taber, Lisa
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:20.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:04:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:04:38Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-06
dc.date.submitted2022-07-19
dc.identifier.citation<p>Moore Simas TA, Leung K, Nuss E, Marieni M, Marcus B, Rosal MC, Chasan-Taber L. Factors Associated with Risk of Perinatal Depressive Symptoms Among Puerto Rican Women with Hyperglycemia. Matern Child Health J. 2022 Apr 6. doi: 10.1007/s10995-022-03429-y. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35386031. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-022-03429-y">Link to article on publisher's site</a></p>
dc.identifier.issn1092-7875 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10995-022-03429-y
dc.identifier.pmid35386031
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44674
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Rates of perinatal depression and pregnancy hyperglycemia are higher in Hispanic women as compared to non-Hispanic white women. In turn, depressive symptoms may reduce a woman's ability to engage in lifestyle changes that could reduce their subsequent diabetes risk. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis using data from Estudio Parto to evaluate sociodemographic, behavioral, psychosocial, and medical factors associated with perinatal depressive symptoms. Estudio Parto was a randomized controlled trial conducted in Western Massachusetts from 2013 to 17. Eligible participants had pregnancy hyperglycemia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was administered at 24-28 weeks gestation and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. An EPDS cutpoint of 10 or greater defined the presence of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: In this sample of Puerto Rican women with pregnancy hyperglycemia, 32% and 27% showed prenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms, respectively. Among participants, 35.5% were diagnosed with GDM, 44.3% with isolated hyperglycemia, and 20.2% with impaired glucose tolerance. In multivariable models, being unmarried (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.51-9.94), prenatal substance use (smoking or alcohol consumption; OR 2.96; 95% CI 1.41-6.18), and maternal age (1.11 for each year; 95% CI 1.04-1.18) were associated with higher odds of prenatal depressive symptoms. None of the risk factors were associated with subsequent postpartum depression in adjusted analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying factors associated with prenatal and postpartum depression in Puerto Rican women with pregnancy hyperglycemia can inform targeted lifestyle interventions in this at-risk group, increase the likely adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and thereby work to address health disparities. CLINICALTRIALS: gov NCT01679210; date of registration 08/07/2012.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=35386031&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a></p>
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-022-03429-y
dc.subjectDiabetes prevention
dc.subjectGestational diabetes
dc.subjectHispanic
dc.subjectPostpartum depression
dc.subjectPrenatal depression
dc.subjectBehavioral Medicine
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectFemale Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications
dc.subjectMaternal and Child Health
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.subjectRace and Ethnicity
dc.subjectWomen's Health
dc.titleFactors Associated with Risk of Perinatal Depressive Symptoms Among Puerto Rican Women with Hyperglycemia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleMaternal and child health journal
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prc_pubs/187
dc.identifier.contextkey30311123
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: Rates of perinatal depression and pregnancy hyperglycemia are higher in Hispanic women as compared to non-Hispanic white women. In turn, depressive symptoms may reduce a woman's ability to engage in lifestyle changes that could reduce their subsequent diabetes risk.</p> <p>METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis using data from Estudio Parto to evaluate sociodemographic, behavioral, psychosocial, and medical factors associated with perinatal depressive symptoms. Estudio Parto was a randomized controlled trial conducted in Western Massachusetts from 2013 to 17. Eligible participants had pregnancy hyperglycemia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was administered at 24-28 weeks gestation and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. An EPDS cutpoint of 10 or greater defined the presence of depressive symptoms.</p> <p>RESULTS: In this sample of Puerto Rican women with pregnancy hyperglycemia, 32% and 27% showed prenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms, respectively. Among participants, 35.5% were diagnosed with GDM, 44.3% with isolated hyperglycemia, and 20.2% with impaired glucose tolerance. In multivariable models, being unmarried (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.51-9.94), prenatal substance use (smoking or alcohol consumption; OR 2.96; 95% CI 1.41-6.18), and maternal age (1.11 for each year; 95% CI 1.04-1.18) were associated with higher odds of prenatal depressive symptoms. None of the risk factors were associated with subsequent postpartum depression in adjusted analyses.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Identifying factors associated with prenatal and postpartum depression in Puerto Rican women with pregnancy hyperglycemia can inform targeted lifestyle interventions in this at-risk group, increase the likely adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and thereby work to address health disparities.</p> <p>CLINICALTRIALS: gov NCT01679210; date of registration 08/07/2012.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprc_pubs/187
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology


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