Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSpring, Bonnie J.
dc.contributor.authorPagoto, Sherry L.
dc.contributor.authorPingitore, Regina
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Neal
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Kristin L.
dc.contributor.authorHedeker, Donald
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:20.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:04:40Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:04:40Z
dc.date.issued2004-10-16
dc.date.submitted2010-07-26
dc.identifier.citationJ Consult Clin Psychol. 2004 Oct;72(5):785-96. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.785">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0022-006X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.785
dc.identifier.pmid15482037
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44684
dc.description.abstractThe authors compared simultaneous versus sequential approaches to multiple health behavior change in diet, exercise, and cigarette smoking. Female regular smokers (N = 315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit smoking at Week 5, and were followed for 9 months after quit date. Weight management was omitted for control and was added to the 1st 8 weeks for early diet (ED) and the final 8 weeks for late diet (LD). ED lacked lasting effect on weight gain, whereas LD initially lacked but gradually acquired a weight-suppression effect that stabilized (p = .004). Behavioral weight control did not undermine smoking cessation and, when initiated after the smoking quit date, slowed the rate of weight gain, supporting a sequential approach.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15482037&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.785
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectBehavior Therapy
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studies
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectSmoking Cessation
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subject*Weight Gain
dc.subjectBehavioral Disciplines and Activities
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titleRandomized controlled trial for behavioral smoking and weight control treatment: effect of concurrent versus sequential intervention
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
dc.source.volume72
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prevbeh_pp/104
dc.identifier.contextkey1409531
html.description.abstract<p>The authors compared simultaneous versus sequential approaches to multiple health behavior change in diet, exercise, and cigarette smoking. Female regular smokers (N = 315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit smoking at Week 5, and were followed for 9 months after quit date. Weight management was omitted for control and was added to the 1st 8 weeks for early diet (ED) and the final 8 weeks for late diet (LD). ED lacked lasting effect on weight gain, whereas LD initially lacked but gradually acquired a weight-suppression effect that stabilized (p = .004). Behavioral weight control did not undermine smoking cessation and, when initiated after the smoking quit date, slowed the rate of weight gain, supporting a sequential approach.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprevbeh_pp/104
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages785-96


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record