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dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Kristin L.
dc.contributor.authorPanza, Emily
dc.contributor.authorAppelhans, Bradley M.
dc.contributor.authorWhited, Matthew C.
dc.contributor.authorOleski, Jessica L.
dc.contributor.authorPagoto, Sherry L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:21.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:05:19Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:05:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-01
dc.date.submitted2012-10-19
dc.identifier.citationAppetite. 2012 Apr;58(2):563-6. Epub 2012 Jan 14. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2012.01.012" target="_blank">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0195-6663 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.appet.2012.01.012
dc.identifier.pmid22266170
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44830
dc.description.abstractWe assessed the validity of the emotional eating scale (EES) by examining whether the EES predicted food intake following two negative mood inductions. Participants underwent mood inductions for anxiety, anger and neutral mood, then received snack foods in a sham palatability test. EES anxiety, but not anger, predicted intake. Participants high on EES anxiety consumed more snacks during the anxiety mood induction, whereas participants low on EES anxiety consumed less snacks. Results suggest that EES anxiety is a predictor of anxiety-driven eating and may be used to assess emotional eating when direct observation of intake is not possible.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=22266170&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2012.01.012
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAffect
dc.subjectAnger
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectEating
dc.subject*Emotions
dc.subjectFeeding Behavior
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectSelf Report
dc.subjectBehavioral Disciplines and Activities
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titleThe emotional eating scale. Can a self-report measure predict observed emotional eating
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAppetite
dc.source.volume58
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prevbeh_pp/252
dc.identifier.contextkey3410704
html.description.abstract<p>We assessed the validity of the emotional eating scale (EES) by examining whether the EES predicted food intake following two negative mood inductions. Participants underwent mood inductions for anxiety, anger and neutral mood, then received snack foods in a sham palatability test. EES anxiety, but not anger, predicted intake. Participants high on EES anxiety consumed more snacks during the anxiety mood induction, whereas participants low on EES anxiety consumed less snacks. Results suggest that EES anxiety is a predictor of anxiety-driven eating and may be used to assess emotional eating when direct observation of intake is not possible.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprevbeh_pp/252
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages563-6


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