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dc.contributor.authorChiriboga, David E.
dc.contributor.authorMa, Yunsheng
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wenjun
dc.contributor.authorStanek, Edward J.
dc.contributor.authorHebert, James R.
dc.contributor.authorMerriam, Philip A.
dc.contributor.authorRawson, Eric S.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Ira S.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:05:50Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:05:50Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-31
dc.date.submitted2010-03-12
dc.identifier.citationClin Chem. 2009 Feb;55(2):313-21. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2008.111245">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0009-9147 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1373/clinchem.2008.111245
dc.identifier.pmid19179270
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44949
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported seasonal variation in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). However, longitudinal data are lacking. METHODS: We collected data on diet, physical activity, psychosocial factors, physiology, and anthropometric measurements from 534 healthy adults (mean age 48 years, 48.5% women, 87% white) at quarterly intervals over a 1-year period between 1994 and 1998. Using sinusoidal regression models, we estimated peak-to-trough amplitude and phase of the peaks. RESULTS: At baseline, average hsCRP was 1.72 mg/L (men, 1.75 mg/L; women, 1.68 mg/L). Overall seasonal variation amplitude was 0.16 mg/L (95% CI 0.02 to 0.30) and was lower in men (0.10 mg/L, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.31) than in women (0.23 mg/L, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.42). In both sexes, hsCRP peaked in November, with a corresponding trough in May. Relative plasma volume, waist and hip circumference, diastolic blood pressure, and depression scores were major factors associated with changes in amplitude of seasonal variation of hsCRP, and taken together explain most of the observed seasonal change. There was a 20% increase in the percentage of participants classified in the high-risk category for hsCRP (> or =3 mg/L) during late fall and early winter compared with late spring and early summer. CONCLUSIONS: Concentrations of hsCRP were modestly increased in fall and winter compared to summer, with greater seasonal amplitude of variation observed in women. Conventional classification methods fail to consider seasonality in hsCRP and may result in substantial misclassifications in the spring and fall. Future clinical practice and research should take these variations into account.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19179270&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2008.111245
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectC-Reactive Protein
dc.subjectData Interpretation, Statistical
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studies
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMultivariate Analysis
dc.subject*Seasons
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectBehavioral Disciplines and Activities
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titleSeasonal and sex variation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in healthy adults: a longitudinal study
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleClinical chemistry
dc.source.volume55
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prevbeh_pp/62
dc.identifier.contextkey1219028
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported seasonal variation in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). However, longitudinal data are lacking.</p> <p>METHODS: We collected data on diet, physical activity, psychosocial factors, physiology, and anthropometric measurements from 534 healthy adults (mean age 48 years, 48.5% women, 87% white) at quarterly intervals over a 1-year period between 1994 and 1998. Using sinusoidal regression models, we estimated peak-to-trough amplitude and phase of the peaks.</p> <p>RESULTS: At baseline, average hsCRP was 1.72 mg/L (men, 1.75 mg/L; women, 1.68 mg/L). Overall seasonal variation amplitude was 0.16 mg/L (95% CI 0.02 to 0.30) and was lower in men (0.10 mg/L, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.31) than in women (0.23 mg/L, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.42). In both sexes, hsCRP peaked in November, with a corresponding trough in May. Relative plasma volume, waist and hip circumference, diastolic blood pressure, and depression scores were major factors associated with changes in amplitude of seasonal variation of hsCRP, and taken together explain most of the observed seasonal change. There was a 20% increase in the percentage of participants classified in the high-risk category for hsCRP (> or =3 mg/L) during late fall and early winter compared with late spring and early summer.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Concentrations of hsCRP were modestly increased in fall and winter compared to summer, with greater seasonal amplitude of variation observed in women. Conventional classification methods fail to consider seasonality in hsCRP and may result in substantial misclassifications in the spring and fall. Future clinical practice and research should take these variations into account.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprevbeh_pp/62
dc.contributor.departmentClinical and Population Health Research Program
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages313-21


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