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dc.contributor.authorMerriam, Philip A.
dc.contributor.authorTellez, Trinidad
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.contributor.authorOlendzki, Barbara C.
dc.contributor.authorMa, Yunsheng
dc.contributor.authorPagoto, Sherry L.
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Ira S.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:05:51Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:05:51Z
dc.date.issued2009-03-17
dc.date.submitted2010-03-12
dc.identifier.citationBMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Mar 13;9:20. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-9-20">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1471-2288 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2288-9-20
dc.identifier.pmid19284663
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44951
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Latinos comprise the largest racial/ethnic group in the United States and have 2-3 times the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus as Caucasians. METHODS AND DESIGN: The Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project (LLDPP) is a community-based translational research study which aims to reduce the risk of diabetes among Latinos who have a >/= 30% probability of developing diabetes in the next 7.5 years per a predictive equation. The project was conducted in Lawrence, Massachusetts, a predominantly Caribbean-origin urban Latino community. Individuals were identified primarily from a community health center's patient panel, screened for study eligibility, randomized to either a usual care or a lifestyle intervention condition, and followed for one year. Like the efficacious Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), the LLDPP intervention targeted weight loss through dietary change and increased physical activity. However, unlike the DPP, the LLDPP intervention was less intensive, tailored to literacy needs and cultural preferences, and delivered in Spanish. The group format of the intervention (13 group sessions over 1 year) was complemented by 3 individual home visits and was implemented by individuals from the community with training and supervision by a clinical research nutritionist and a behavioral psychologist. Study measures included demographics, Stern predictive equation components (age, gender, ethnicity, fasting glucose, systolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, body mass index, and family history of diabetes), glycosylated hemoglobin, dietary intake, physical activity, depressive symptoms, social support, quality of life, and medication use. Body weight was measured at baseline, 6-months, and one-year; all other measures were assessed at baseline and one-year. All surveys were orally administered in Spanish. RESULTS: A community-academic partnership enabled the successful recruitment, intervention, and assessment of Latinos at risk of diabetes with a one-year study retention rate of 93%. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00810290.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19284663&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.subject*Community-Institutional Relations
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus
dc.subject*Hispanic Americans
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titleMethodology of a diabetes prevention translational research project utilizing a community-academic partnership for implementation in an underserved Latino community
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleBMC medical research methodology
dc.source.volume9
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1063&amp;context=prevbeh_pp&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prevbeh_pp/64
dc.identifier.contextkey1219030
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:05:51Z
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Latinos comprise the largest racial/ethnic group in the United States and have 2-3 times the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus as Caucasians.</p> <p>METHODS AND DESIGN: The Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project (LLDPP) is a community-based translational research study which aims to reduce the risk of diabetes among Latinos who have a >/= 30% probability of developing diabetes in the next 7.5 years per a predictive equation. The project was conducted in Lawrence, Massachusetts, a predominantly Caribbean-origin urban Latino community. Individuals were identified primarily from a community health center's patient panel, screened for study eligibility, randomized to either a usual care or a lifestyle intervention condition, and followed for one year. Like the efficacious Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), the LLDPP intervention targeted weight loss through dietary change and increased physical activity. However, unlike the DPP, the LLDPP intervention was less intensive, tailored to literacy needs and cultural preferences, and delivered in Spanish. The group format of the intervention (13 group sessions over 1 year) was complemented by 3 individual home visits and was implemented by individuals from the community with training and supervision by a clinical research nutritionist and a behavioral psychologist. Study measures included demographics, Stern predictive equation components (age, gender, ethnicity, fasting glucose, systolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, body mass index, and family history of diabetes), glycosylated hemoglobin, dietary intake, physical activity, depressive symptoms, social support, quality of life, and medication use. Body weight was measured at baseline, 6-months, and one-year; all other measures were assessed at baseline and one-year. All surveys were orally administered in Spanish.</p> <p>RESULTS: A community-academic partnership enabled the successful recruitment, intervention, and assessment of Latinos at risk of diabetes with a one-year study retention rate of 93%.</p> <p>TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00810290.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprevbeh_pp/64
dc.contributor.departmentFamily Medicine and Community Health
dc.contributor.departmentMedicine
dc.source.pages20


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