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dc.contributor.authorLemon, Stephenie C
dc.contributor.authorZapka, Jane
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wenjun
dc.contributor.authorEstabrook, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorMagner, Robert P.
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros C
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:05:54Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:05:54Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-10
dc.date.submitted2010-03-19
dc.identifier.citationAm J Health Behav. 2009 May-Jun;33(3):299-308. <a href="http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/png/ajhb/2009/00000033/00000003/art00008">Link to article on publisher's website</a>
dc.identifier.issn1087-3244 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid19063651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44962
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of perceptions of organizational commitment to employee health and coworker physical activity and eating behaviors with body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and eating behaviors in hospital employees. METHODS: Baseline data from 899 employees participating in a worksite weight-gain prevention trial were analyzed. RESULTS: Greater perception of organizational commitment to employee health was associated with lower BMI. Greater perceptions of coworker healthy eating and physical activity behaviors were associated with fruit and vegetable and saturated fat consumption and physical activity, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Improving organizational commitment and facilitating supportive interpersonal environments could improve obesity control among working populations.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=19063651&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2614118/pdf/nihms82754.pdf
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject*Diet
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Behavior
dc.subjectHealth Promotion
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subject*Motor Activity
dc.subjectObesity
dc.subjectOccupational Health Services
dc.subject*Organizational Culture
dc.subjectPerception
dc.subjectSocial Environment
dc.subject*Workplace
dc.subjectBehavioral Disciplines and Activities
dc.subjectBehavior and Behavior Mechanisms
dc.subjectCommunity Health and Preventive Medicine
dc.subjectPreventive Medicine
dc.titlePerceptions of worksite support and employee obesity, activity, and diet
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican journal of health behavior
dc.source.volume33
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/prevbeh_pp/74
dc.identifier.contextkey1234283
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of perceptions of organizational commitment to employee health and coworker physical activity and eating behaviors with body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and eating behaviors in hospital employees.</p> <p>METHODS: Baseline data from 899 employees participating in a worksite weight-gain prevention trial were analyzed.</p> <p>RESULTS: Greater perception of organizational commitment to employee health was associated with lower BMI. Greater perceptions of coworker healthy eating and physical activity behaviors were associated with fruit and vegetable and saturated fat consumption and physical activity, respectively.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: Improving organizational commitment and facilitating supportive interpersonal environments could improve obesity control among working populations.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathprevbeh_pp/74
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
dc.source.pages299-308


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