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dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Carol A.
dc.contributor.authorMulvey, Edward P.
dc.contributor.authorLidz, Charles W.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, William P.
dc.contributor.authorSkeem, Jennifer L.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:22.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:06:01Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:06:01Z
dc.date.issued2005-03-25
dc.date.submitted2010-10-14
dc.identifier.citationJ Interpers Violence. 2005 May;20(5):632-46. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260504272639">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0886-2605 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0886260504272639
dc.identifier.pmid15788558
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/44994
dc.description.abstractTo address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over time, and retaining participants across the course of the study. We applied this approach to conduct a study designed to identify changeable risk factors for violence among high-risk people with mental illness. To successfully conduct weekly interviews of these individuals in the community across a 6-month period, we developed a flexible and personalized interview format; carefully selected, trained, and supervised staff; and developed incentives to maximize participant retention. Each of these three steps is discussed as a guide for future longitudinal studies that involve interviewing difficult populations.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15788558&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260504272639
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAggression
dc.subjectAntisocial Personality Disorder
dc.subjectCommunity Mental Health Centers
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInterviews as Topic
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studies
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectRisk Factors
dc.subject*Risk-Taking
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleWeekly community interviews with high-risk participants: operational issues
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of interpersonal violence
dc.source.volume20
dc.source.issue5
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/103
dc.identifier.contextkey1605186
html.description.abstract<p>To address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over time, and retaining participants across the course of the study. We applied this approach to conduct a study designed to identify changeable risk factors for violence among high-risk people with mental illness. To successfully conduct weekly interviews of these individuals in the community across a 6-month period, we developed a flexible and personalized interview format; carefully selected, trained, and supervised staff; and developed incentives to maximize participant retention. Each of these three steps is discussed as a guide for future longitudinal studies that involve interviewing difficult populations.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/103
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages632-46


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