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dc.contributor.authorCrockett, Lisa J.
dc.contributor.authorIturbide, Maria I.
dc.contributor.authorTorres Stone, Rosalie A.
dc.contributor.authorMcGinley, Meredith
dc.contributor.authorRaffaelli, Marcela
dc.contributor.authorCarlo, Gustavo
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:23.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:06:34Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:06:34Z
dc.date.issued2007-10-31
dc.date.submitted2010-12-06
dc.identifier.citationCultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2007 Oct;13(4):347-55. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1099-9809.13.4.347">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1077-341X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/1099-9809.13.4.347
dc.identifier.pmid17967103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45128
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relations between acculturative stress and psychological functioning, as well as the protective role of social support and coping style, in a sample of 148 Mexican American college students (67% female, 33% male; mean age = 23.05 years, SD = 3.33). In bivariate analyses, acculturative stress was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Moreover, active coping was associated with better adjustment (lower depression), whereas avoidant coping predicted poorer adjustment (higher levels of depression and anxiety). Tests of interaction effects indicated that parental support and active coping buffered the effects of high acculturative stress on anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. In addition, peer support moderated the relation between acculturative stress and anxiety symptoms. Implications for reducing the effects of acculturative stress among Mexican American college students are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=17967103&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1099-9809.13.4.347
dc.subject*Acculturation
dc.subject*Adaptation, Psychological
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMexican Americans
dc.subject*Social Support
dc.subjectStress, Psychological
dc.subjectStudents
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleAcculturative stress, social support, and coping: relations to psychological adjustment among Mexican American college students
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleCultural diversity and ethnic minority psychology
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue4
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/235
dc.identifier.contextkey1672909
html.description.abstract<p>This study examined the relations between acculturative stress and psychological functioning, as well as the protective role of social support and coping style, in a sample of 148 Mexican American college students (67% female, 33% male; mean age = 23.05 years, SD = 3.33). In bivariate analyses, acculturative stress was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Moreover, active coping was associated with better adjustment (lower depression), whereas avoidant coping predicted poorer adjustment (higher levels of depression and anxiety). Tests of interaction effects indicated that parental support and active coping buffered the effects of high acculturative stress on anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. In addition, peer support moderated the relation between acculturative stress and anxiety symptoms. Implications for reducing the effects of acculturative stress among Mexican American college students are discussed.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/235
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology
dc.source.pages347-55


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