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dc.contributor.authorCorrado, Raymond R.
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Gina M.
dc.contributor.authorHart, Stephen D.
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Irwin M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:23.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:07:05Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:07:05Z
dc.date.issued2004-02-14
dc.date.submitted2011-01-28
dc.identifier.citationBehav Sci Law. 2004;22(1):5-22. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bsl.574">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0735-3936 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bsl.574
dc.identifier.pmid14963878
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45254
dc.description.abstractSeveral authors have expressed concern regarding the use of youth psychopathy assessments in determinations of risk for general and violent offending. The Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV) was completed with 182 male adolescent offenders in this prospective study (average 14.5 month follow-up) of general and violent recidivism. Both a two-factor and three-factor model of the PCL:YV significantly predicted general and violent recidivism at a predictive accuracy ranging from 68 to 63%. However, regression analyses indicated these associations were explained primarily by behavioral psychopathic symptoms, rather than interpersonal or affective traits. Implications for the use of psychopathy assessments for risk during adolescence are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=14963878&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bsl.574
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAntisocial Personality Disorder
dc.subjectCanada
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studies
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectModels, Statistical
dc.subjectPredictive Value of Tests
dc.subjectPsychological Tests
dc.subjectRecurrence
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titlePredictive validity of the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version for general and violent recidivism
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioral sciences and the law
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/352
dc.identifier.contextkey1751697
html.description.abstract<p>Several authors have expressed concern regarding the use of youth psychopathy assessments in determinations of risk for general and violent offending. The Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV) was completed with 182 male adolescent offenders in this prospective study (average 14.5 month follow-up) of general and violent recidivism. Both a two-factor and three-factor model of the PCL:YV significantly predicted general and violent recidivism at a predictive accuracy ranging from 68 to 63%. However, regression analyses indicated these associations were explained primarily by behavioral psychopathic symptoms, rather than interpersonal or affective traits. Implications for the use of psychopathy assessments for risk during adolescence are discussed.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/352
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages5-22


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