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dc.contributor.authorCandilis, Philip J.
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Renee Y.
dc.contributor.authorOtto, Michael W.
dc.contributor.authorManfro, Gisele G.
dc.contributor.authorWorthington, John J. III
dc.contributor.authorPenava, Susan J.
dc.contributor.authorMarzol, Patricia C.
dc.contributor.authorPollack, M. H.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:07:14Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:07:14Z
dc.date.issued1999-07-01
dc.date.submitted2011-03-01
dc.identifier.citationJ Nerv Ment Dis. 1999 Jul;187(7):429-34.
dc.identifier.issn0022-3018 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid10426463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45292
dc.description.abstractIn this study we assessed the quality of life of patients with panic disorder, with particular attention to the influence of anxiety and depression comorbidity on quality of life. Findings were compared with established general population norms as well as norms for patients with chronic medical conditions and major depression. The Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was administered to panic disorder patients entering clinical trials or treatment in an outpatient anxiety disorders program. Subjects were 73 consecutive patients with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder without current substance abuse or contributory medical illness. Their quality of life scores were compared with population mean estimates using single-sample t-tests, and the influence of comorbidity was examined with between-group comparisons. All SF-36 mental and physical health subscale scores were worse in patients with panic disorder than in the general population. This was true regardless of the presence of comorbid anxiety or mood disorders, although the presence of the comorbid conditions worsened select areas of functioning according to subscale analyses. SF-36 scores in panic patients were at approximately the same level as patients with major depression and tended to be worse in specific areas than patients with select medical conditions. This study provides evidence of the pervasive negative effects of panic disorder on both mental and physical health.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=10426463&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00005053-199907000-00006&LSLINK=80&D=ovft
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAgoraphobia
dc.subjectAnxiety Disorders
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectDepressive Disorder
dc.subjectEducational Status
dc.subjectEmployment
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subject*Health Status
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMarital Status
dc.subjectPanic Disorder
dc.subjectPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subject*Quality of Life
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Index
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectBehavioral Disciplines and Activities
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleQuality of life in patients with panic disorder
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of nervous and mental disease
dc.source.volume187
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/390
dc.identifier.contextkey1833484
html.description.abstract<p>In this study we assessed the quality of life of patients with panic disorder, with particular attention to the influence of anxiety and depression comorbidity on quality of life. Findings were compared with established general population norms as well as norms for patients with chronic medical conditions and major depression. The Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was administered to panic disorder patients entering clinical trials or treatment in an outpatient anxiety disorders program. Subjects were 73 consecutive patients with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder without current substance abuse or contributory medical illness. Their quality of life scores were compared with population mean estimates using single-sample t-tests, and the influence of comorbidity was examined with between-group comparisons. All SF-36 mental and physical health subscale scores were worse in patients with panic disorder than in the general population. This was true regardless of the presence of comorbid anxiety or mood disorders, although the presence of the comorbid conditions worsened select areas of functioning according to subscale analyses. SF-36 scores in panic patients were at approximately the same level as patients with major depression and tended to be worse in specific areas than patients with select medical conditions. This study provides evidence of the pervasive negative effects of panic disorder on both mental and physical health.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/390
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages429-34


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