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dc.contributor.authorKoroloff, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Maryann
dc.contributor.authorJohnsen, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorStarrett, Barbara E.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:07:24Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:07:24Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.date.submitted2011-07-28
dc.identifier.citation<p>Koroloff, N<strong>., </strong>Davis, M., Johnsen, M., & Starrett, B., (2009). <em>Under Construction: Linkages between Youth and Adult Systems.</em> Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services.</p>
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45333
dc.description.abstractSummary: This report summarizes changes between 2003 and 2007 in relationships among organizations that offer services to individuals in transition to adulthood, ages 14‐25, who have serious mental health conditions in Clark County, Washington. In 2002 Clark County received a Partnerships for Youth Transition grant from the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), Division of Service and Systems Improvement, Child, Adolescent and Family Branch. The purpose of these grants was to plan, design, and implement programs to support the transition to adulthood for youth with serious mental health conditions up to age 25 and their families. Services for these youths span child and adult mental health service systems, and many different systems (e.g., vocational rehabilitation, substance abuse, education). Understanding how this vast array of services and systems interacted and changed over the course of the grant helps to identify whether such grants can positively impact the kinds of interactions that facilitate the process of transition for young people maturing into adulthood. While each locale has its own particular set of services, policies, and organizing forces, it is hoped that the findings in this county provide insight into systems in other sites. The primary audience for this report includes policy makers, state and regional administrators, program designers, and others interested in improving the network of services and supports for transition age youth (TAY) from mental health and other systems that TAY are involved with during their transition to adulthood. Others who may be interested in these findings include youth, family members, youth allies, and service providers.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdolescent Health Services
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Health Services
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectMental Health Services
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleUnder Construction: Linkages between Youth and Adult Systems after Expanding Transition Services
dc.typeOther
dc.identifier.legacyfulltexthttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1462&amp;context=psych_cmhsr&amp;unstamped=1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/439
dc.identifier.contextkey2120840
refterms.dateFOA2022-08-23T17:07:25Z
html.description.abstract<p>Summary: This report summarizes changes between 2003 and 2007 in relationships among organizations that offer services to individuals in transition to adulthood, ages 14‐25, who have serious mental health conditions in Clark County, Washington. In 2002 Clark County received a Partnerships for Youth Transition grant from the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), Division of Service and Systems Improvement, Child, Adolescent and Family Branch. The purpose of these grants was to plan, design, and implement programs to support the transition to adulthood for youth with serious mental health conditions up to age 25 and their families. Services for these youths span child and adult mental health service systems, and many different systems (e.g., vocational rehabilitation, substance abuse, education). Understanding how this vast array of services and systems interacted and changed over the course of the grant helps to identify whether such grants can positively impact the kinds of interactions that facilitate the process of transition for young people maturing into adulthood. While each locale has its own particular set of services, policies, and organizing forces, it is hoped that the findings in this county provide insight into systems in other sites. The primary audience for this report includes policy makers, state and regional administrators, program designers, and others interested in improving the network of services and supports for transition age youth (TAY) from mental health and other systems that TAY are involved with during their transition to adulthood. Others who may be interested in these findings include youth, family members, youth allies, and service providers.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/439
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry


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