Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKim, Sun S.
dc.contributor.authorLen, Thu Ha
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Hoa L
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:24.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:07:34Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:07:34Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-01
dc.date.submitted2012-03-22
dc.identifier.citationJ Transcult Nurs. 2012 Apr;23(2):151-8. Epub 2012 Jan 31. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1043659611434060">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1043-6596 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1043659611434060
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45371
dc.description.abstractThe study was conducted (a) to assess use of any smoking cessation medications, (b) to identify factors associated with smoking, and (c) to assess knowledge of the health effects of smoking and attitudes toward smoking and seeking help for quitting among Vietnamese Americans. This is a descriptive study conducted with a nonrepresentative sample of 163 Vietnamese Americans. Current and former smokers constituted 24.4% and 25.6% of men and 1.2% and 3.5% of women, respectively. Of 20 current smokers, 17 (85%) reported use of cessation medications in their past quit attempts. Acculturation was the only significant correlate of ever smoking (vs. never smoking) in multivariate logistic regression analyses. Men who were less acculturated had more than 5 times the odds of being ever smokers (odds ratio = 5.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.37-20.78) compared with more acculturated men. Most participants had correct knowledge of the health effects of smoking regardless of age, education level, and smoking status. Attitudes toward smoking differed by age and education level but not by smoking status. Nurses working with Vietnamese Americans should be aware of the high rate of smoking among male immigrants and provide smoking cessation interventions.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=22294338&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1043659611434060
dc.subjectSmoking
dc.subjectSmoking Cessation
dc.subjectAsian Americans
dc.subjectHealth Services Research
dc.subjectMental and Social Health
dc.subjectPsychiatric and Mental Health
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Psychology
dc.titleCulture and Smoking Among Vietnamese Americans in Central Massachusetts
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of transcultural nursing : official journal of the Transcultural Nursing Society / Transcultural Nursing Society
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_cmhsr/490
dc.identifier.contextkey2690880
html.description.abstract<p>The study was conducted (a) to assess use of any smoking cessation medications, (b) to identify factors associated with smoking, and (c) to assess knowledge of the health effects of smoking and attitudes toward smoking and seeking help for quitting among Vietnamese Americans. This is a descriptive study conducted with a nonrepresentative sample of 163 Vietnamese Americans. Current and former smokers constituted 24.4% and 25.6% of men and 1.2% and 3.5% of women, respectively. Of 20 current smokers, 17 (85%) reported use of cessation medications in their past quit attempts. Acculturation was the only significant correlate of ever smoking (vs. never smoking) in multivariate logistic regression analyses. Men who were less acculturated had more than 5 times the odds of being ever smokers (odds ratio = 5.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.37-20.78) compared with more acculturated men. Most participants had correct knowledge of the health effects of smoking regardless of age, education level, and smoking status. Attitudes toward smoking differed by age and education level but not by smoking status. Nurses working with Vietnamese Americans should be aware of the high rate of smoking among male immigrants and provide smoking cessation interventions.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_cmhsr/490
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages151-8


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record