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dc.contributor.authorRothschild, Anthony J.
dc.contributor.authorLanglais, Philip J.
dc.contributor.authorSchatzberg, Alan F.
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Francis X.
dc.contributor.authorCole, Jonathan O.
dc.contributor.authorBird, Edward D.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:26.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:08:39Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:08:39Z
dc.date.issued1984-01-01
dc.date.submitted2010-05-05
dc.identifier.citationJ Psychiatr Res. 1984;18(3):217-23.
dc.identifier.issn0022-3956 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid6492009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45627
dc.description.abstractIn man, unconjugated plasma DA is normally undetectable or present in minute amounts. Twelve medication-free volunteers received a 1 mg dose of dexamethasone which produced pronounced increases of plasma free DA but not of other catecholamines. Mean plasma free dopamine levels after dexamethasone at 8 a.m. (155 +/- 102 pg/ml) and 4 p.m. (163 +/- 70 pg/ml) were significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than those at 8 a.m. (50 +/- 18 pg/ml) and 4 p.m. (42 +/- 7 pg/ml) before dexamethasone. Although the mechanism of increased dopaminergic activity after a dose of dexamethasone remains for future research, the data presented in this paper may explain the observations that corticosteroids lower prolactin levels and may induce psychiatric disturbances, as well as the finding that depressed patients with high postdexamethasone cortisol levels are frequently psychotic.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=6492009&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-3956(84)90012-8
dc.subjectAdrenal Cortex Hormones
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectCatecholamines
dc.subjectDexamethasone
dc.subjectDopamine
dc.subjectEpinephrine
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHydrocortisone
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectNorepinephrine
dc.subjectProlactin
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleDexamethasone increases plasma free dopamine in man
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of psychiatric research
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/16
dc.identifier.contextkey1299363
html.description.abstract<p>In man, unconjugated plasma DA is normally undetectable or present in minute amounts. Twelve medication-free volunteers received a 1 mg dose of dexamethasone which produced pronounced increases of plasma free DA but not of other catecholamines. Mean plasma free dopamine levels after dexamethasone at 8 a.m. (155 +/- 102 pg/ml) and 4 p.m. (163 +/- 70 pg/ml) were significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than those at 8 a.m. (50 +/- 18 pg/ml) and 4 p.m. (42 +/- 7 pg/ml) before dexamethasone. Although the mechanism of increased dopaminergic activity after a dose of dexamethasone remains for future research, the data presented in this paper may explain the observations that corticosteroids lower prolactin levels and may induce psychiatric disturbances, as well as the finding that depressed patients with high postdexamethasone cortisol levels are frequently psychotic.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/16
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages217-23


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