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dc.contributor.authorGrisso, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Gina M.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:09:08Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:09:08Z
dc.date.issued2005-05-04
dc.date.submitted2010-09-10
dc.identifier.citationLaw Hum Behav. 2005 Feb;29(1):1-5.
dc.identifier.issn0147-7307 (Linking)
dc.identifier.pmid15865329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45744
dc.description.abstractThis article introduces a special issue of Law and Human Behavior, including five articles describing the limits of forensic mental health assessments of (a) risk of violence in female adolescents, (b) sexually violent predators, (c) dangerousness in capital murder cases, (d) child sexual abuse, and (e) PTSD litigants. Knowing the limits of forensic mental health assessment methods is essential in order to recognize their strengths, increase the credibility of forensic mental health assessment, and drive research that will enhance the value of assessments for the courts.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15865329&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/4499405
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectChild
dc.subject*Dangerous Behavior
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subject*Forensic Psychiatry
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subject*Risk Assessment
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleThe empirical limits of forensic mental health assessment
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleLaw and human behavior
dc.source.volume29
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/273
dc.identifier.contextkey1550399
html.description.abstract<p>This article introduces a special issue of Law and Human Behavior, including five articles describing the limits of forensic mental health assessments of (a) risk of violence in female adolescents, (b) sexually violent predators, (c) dangerousness in capital murder cases, (d) child sexual abuse, and (e) PTSD litigants. Knowing the limits of forensic mental health assessment methods is essential in order to recognize their strengths, increase the credibility of forensic mental health assessment, and drive research that will enhance the value of assessments for the courts.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/273
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages1-5


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