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dc.contributor.authorGrisso, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorAppelbaum, Paul S.
dc.contributor.authorHill-Fotouhi, Carolyn
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:09:12Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:09:12Z
dc.date.issued1997-11-01
dc.date.submitted2010-09-22
dc.identifier.citationGrisso, T., & Appelbaum, P.S. (1997). The MacCAT-T: A clinical tool to assess patients’ capacities to make treatment decisions. Psychiatric Services, 48, 1415-1419.
dc.identifier.issn1075-2730
dc.identifier.pmid9355168
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45758
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The feasibility, reliability, and validity of a new instrument, the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Treatment (MacCAT-T), which was developed for use by clinicians, was tested. The instrument assesses patients' competence to make treatment decisions by examining their capacities in four areas--understanding information relevant to their condition and the recommended treatment, reasoning about the potential risks and benefits of their choices, appreciating the nature of their situation and the consequences of their choices, and expressing a choice. METHOD: The MacCAT-T and instruments to measure symptom severity were administered to 40 patients recently hospitalized with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 40 matched subjects in the community without mental illness. RESULTS: A high degree of ease of use and interrater reliability was found for the MacCAT-T. Overall, the hospitalized patients performed significantly more poorly than the community subjects on understanding and reasoning, although many patients performed as well as community subjects. Poor performance was related to higher levels of some psychiatric symptoms, such as conceptual disorganization, hallucinations, and disorientation. CONCLUSIONS: The MacCAT-T offers a flexible yet structured method with which caregivers can assess, rate, and report patients' abilities relevant for evaluating competence to consent to treatment.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychiatric Association
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9355168&dopt=Abstract">Link to article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/reprint/48/11/1415
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectBrief Psychiatric Rating Scale
dc.subjectFeasibility Studies
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInformed Consent
dc.subjectLegal Guardians
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Competency
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Tests
dc.subjectObserver Variation
dc.subjectPatient Participation
dc.subjectPsychometrics
dc.subjectPsychotic Disorders
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleThe MacCAT-T: a clinical tool to assess patients' capacities to make treatment decisions
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
dc.source.volume48
dc.source.issue11
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/287
dc.identifier.contextkey1571743
html.description.abstract<p>OBJECTIVE: The feasibility, reliability, and validity of a new instrument, the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Treatment (MacCAT-T), which was developed for use by clinicians, was tested. The instrument assesses patients' competence to make treatment decisions by examining their capacities in four areas--understanding information relevant to their condition and the recommended treatment, reasoning about the potential risks and benefits of their choices, appreciating the nature of their situation and the consequences of their choices, and expressing a choice.</p> <p>METHOD: The MacCAT-T and instruments to measure symptom severity were administered to 40 patients recently hospitalized with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 40 matched subjects in the community without mental illness.</p> <p>RESULTS: A high degree of ease of use and interrater reliability was found for the MacCAT-T. Overall, the hospitalized patients performed significantly more poorly than the community subjects on understanding and reasoning, although many patients performed as well as community subjects. Poor performance was related to higher levels of some psychiatric symptoms, such as conceptual disorganization, hallucinations, and disorientation.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: The MacCAT-T offers a flexible yet structured method with which caregivers can assess, rate, and report patients' abilities relevant for evaluating competence to consent to treatment.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/287
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry


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