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dc.contributor.authorBanks, Steven M.
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Pamela Clark
dc.contributor.authorSilver, Eric
dc.contributor.authorVesselinov, Roumen
dc.contributor.authorSteadman, Henry J.
dc.contributor.authorMonahan, John
dc.contributor.authorMulvey, Edward P.
dc.contributor.authorAppelbaum, Paul S.
dc.contributor.authorGrisso, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Loren H.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:09:13Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:09:13Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-01
dc.date.submitted2010-09-22
dc.identifier.citationBanks, S., Robbins, P., Silver, E., Vesselinov, R., Steadman, H., Monahan, J., Mulvey, E., Appelbaum, P., Grisso, T., & Roth, L. A multiple-models approach to violence risk assessment among people with mental disorder. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 31, 324-341. doi: 10.1177/0093854804263635
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0093854804263635
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45765
dc.description.abstractActuarial models for violenc erisk assessment have proliferated in recent years. In this article, we describe an approach that integrates the predictions of many actuarial risk-assessment models, each of which may capture a different but important facet of the interactive relationship between the measured risk factors and violence. Using this multiple-models approach, we ultimately combined the results of five prediction models generated by the iterative classification tree (ICT) methodology developed in the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study. This combination of models produced results not only superior to those of any of its constituent models, but superior to any other actuarial violence risk-assessment procedure reported in the literature to date.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0093854804263635
dc.subjectMentally Ill Persons
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectRisk Assessment
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleA Multiple-Models Approach to Violence Risk Assessment Among People with Mental Disorder
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleCriminal Justice and Behavior
dc.source.volume31
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/294
dc.identifier.contextkey1571557
html.description.abstract<p>Actuarial models for violenc erisk assessment have proliferated in recent years. In this article, we describe an approach that integrates the predictions of many actuarial risk-assessment models, each of which may capture a different but important facet of the interactive relationship between the measured risk factors and violence. Using this multiple-models approach, we ultimately combined the results of five prediction models generated by the iterative classification tree (ICT) methodology developed in the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study. This combination of models produced results not only superior to those of any of its constituent models, but superior to any other actuarial violence risk-assessment procedure reported in the literature to date.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/294
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages324-341


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