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dc.contributor.authorLuo, Feng
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhixin
dc.contributor.authorTreistman, Steven N.
dc.contributor.authorKim, Young Ro
dc.contributor.authorKing, Jean A.
dc.contributor.authorFox, Gerard B.
dc.contributor.authorFerris, Craig F.
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:09:27Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:09:27Z
dc.date.issued2007-08-31
dc.date.submitted2010-11-01
dc.identifier.citationJ Magn Reson Imaging. 2007 Sep;26(3):557-63. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21083">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn1053-1807 (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jmri.21083
dc.identifier.pmid17729349
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45823
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To compare and contrast the pattern and characteristics of the cerebral blood volume (CBV) response to ethanol (EtOH) in rats under awake and anesthetized conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Acute EtOH (0.75 g/kg) challenge-induced CBV changes were measured using a contrast-enhanced functional MRI CBV method in 15 male Sprague Dawley rats under three experimental conditions: 1.0% to 1.2% isoflurane (N = 5); 0.8% halothane (N = 5); and awake with no anesthetic (N = 5). Physiological parameters were collected from bench settings in nine rats from the above different conditions. Four parameters: 1) area under the curve (AUC%); 2) the maximum signal change (Max%); 3) EtOH absorption rate (alpha(2)); and 4) EtOH elimination rate (alpha(1)) were employed to compare EtOH-induced MRI signals between the awake and anesthetized groups. RESULTS: Both awake and anesthetized animals responded with an increase in CBV to EtOH challenge. However, the presence of anesthesia promoted a significant preferential flow to subcortical areas not seen in the awake condition. CONCLUSION: Unclear mechanisms of anesthesia add a layer of uncertainty to the already complex interpretation of EtOH's influence on neuronal activity, cellular metabolism, and hemodynamic coupling.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=17729349&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21083
dc.subject*Anesthesia
dc.subjectAnesthesiology
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectArea Under Curve
dc.subjectBlood Volume
dc.subjectCerebral Cortex
dc.subjectCerebrovascular Circulation
dc.subjectEthanol
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectNeurons
dc.subjectProsencephalon
dc.subjectRats
dc.subjectRats, Sprague-Dawley
dc.subjectTime Factors
dc.subjectAnesthesiology
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleConfounding effects of volatile anesthesia on CBV assessment in rodent forebrain following ethanol challenge
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI
dc.source.volume26
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/352
dc.identifier.contextkey1625934
html.description.abstract<p>PURPOSE: To compare and contrast the pattern and characteristics of the cerebral blood volume (CBV) response to ethanol (EtOH) in rats under awake and anesthetized conditions.</p> <p>MATERIALS AND METHODS: Acute EtOH (0.75 g/kg) challenge-induced CBV changes were measured using a contrast-enhanced functional MRI CBV method in 15 male Sprague Dawley rats under three experimental conditions: 1.0% to 1.2% isoflurane (N = 5); 0.8% halothane (N = 5); and awake with no anesthetic (N = 5). Physiological parameters were collected from bench settings in nine rats from the above different conditions. Four parameters: 1) area under the curve (AUC%); 2) the maximum signal change (Max%); 3) EtOH absorption rate (alpha(2)); and 4) EtOH elimination rate (alpha(1)) were employed to compare EtOH-induced MRI signals between the awake and anesthetized groups.</p> <p>RESULTS: Both awake and anesthetized animals responded with an increase in CBV to EtOH challenge. However, the presence of anesthesia promoted a significant preferential flow to subcortical areas not seen in the awake condition.</p> <p>CONCLUSION: Unclear mechanisms of anesthesia add a layer of uncertainty to the already complex interpretation of EtOH's influence on neuronal activity, cellular metabolism, and hemodynamic coupling.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/352
dc.contributor.departmentTreistman Lab
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anesthesiology
dc.source.pages557-63


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