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dc.contributor.authorFrazier, Jean A.
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Sufen
dc.contributor.authorBreeze, Janis L.
dc.contributor.authorMakris, Nikos
dc.contributor.authorLange, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, David N.
dc.contributor.authorHerbert, Martha R.
dc.contributor.authorBent, Eileen K.
dc.contributor.authorKoneru, Vamsi K.
dc.contributor.authorDieterich, Megan E.
dc.contributor.authorHodge, Steven M
dc.contributor.authorRauch, Scott L.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, P. Ellen
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Bruce M.
dc.contributor.authorSeidman, Larry J.
dc.contributor.authorCaviness, Verne S. Jr.
dc.contributor.authorBiederman, Joseph
dc.date2022-08-11T08:10:27.000
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-23T17:09:38Z
dc.date.available2022-08-23T17:09:38Z
dc.date.issued2005-07-05
dc.date.submitted2011-02-10
dc.identifier.citationAm J Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;162(7):1256-65. <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.162.7.1256">Link to article on publisher's site</a>
dc.identifier.issn0002-953X (Linking)
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.162.7.1256
dc.identifier.pmid15994707
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/45867
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Youths with bipolar disorder are ideal for studying illness pathophysiology given their early presentation, lack of extended treatment, and high genetic loading. Adult bipolar disorder MRI studies have focused increasingly on limbic structures and the thalamus because of their role in mood and cognition. On the basis of adult studies, the authors hypothesized a priori that youths with bipolar disorder would have amygdalar, hippocampal, and thalamic volume abnormalities. METHOD: Forty-three youths 6-16 years of age with DSM-IV bipolar disorder (23 male, 20 female) and 20 healthy comparison subjects (12 male, eight female) similar in age and sex underwent structured and clinical interviews, neurological examination, and cognitive testing. Differences in limbic and thalamic brain volumes, on the logarithmic scale, were tested using a two-way (diagnosis and sex) univariate analysis of variance, with total cerebral volume and age controlled. RESULTS: The subjects with bipolar disorder had smaller hippocampal volumes. Further analysis revealed that this effect was driven predominantly by the female bipolar disorder subjects. In addition, both male and female youths with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller cerebral volumes. No significant hemispheric effects were seen. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hypothesis that the limbic system, in particular the hippocampus, may be involved in the pathophysiology of pediatric bipolar disorder. While this report may represent the largest MRI study of pediatric bipolar disorder to date, more work is needed to confirm these findings and to determine if they are unique to pediatric bipolar disorder.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15994707&dopt=Abstract">Link to Article in PubMed</a>
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.162.7.1256
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAge Factors
dc.subjectAmbulatory Care
dc.subjectAtrophy
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectBrain Mapping
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHippocampus
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImage Processing, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectLimbic System
dc.subject*Magnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectOrgan Size
dc.subjectPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subjectSex Factors
dc.subjectTelencephalon
dc.subjectThalamus
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.titleStructural brain magnetic resonance imaging of limbic and thalamic volumes in pediatric bipolar disorder
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.source.journaltitleThe American journal of psychiatry
dc.source.volume162
dc.source.issue7
dc.identifier.legacycoverpagehttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/397
dc.identifier.contextkey1775333
html.description.abstract<p>BACKGROUND: Youths with bipolar disorder are ideal for studying illness pathophysiology given their early presentation, lack of extended treatment, and high genetic loading. Adult bipolar disorder MRI studies have focused increasingly on limbic structures and the thalamus because of their role in mood and cognition. On the basis of adult studies, the authors hypothesized a priori that youths with bipolar disorder would have amygdalar, hippocampal, and thalamic volume abnormalities.</p> <p>METHOD: Forty-three youths 6-16 years of age with DSM-IV bipolar disorder (23 male, 20 female) and 20 healthy comparison subjects (12 male, eight female) similar in age and sex underwent structured and clinical interviews, neurological examination, and cognitive testing. Differences in limbic and thalamic brain volumes, on the logarithmic scale, were tested using a two-way (diagnosis and sex) univariate analysis of variance, with total cerebral volume and age controlled.</p> <p>RESULTS: The subjects with bipolar disorder had smaller hippocampal volumes. Further analysis revealed that this effect was driven predominantly by the female bipolar disorder subjects. In addition, both male and female youths with bipolar disorder had significantly smaller cerebral volumes. No significant hemispheric effects were seen.</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hypothesis that the limbic system, in particular the hippocampus, may be involved in the pathophysiology of pediatric bipolar disorder. While this report may represent the largest MRI study of pediatric bipolar disorder to date, more work is needed to confirm these findings and to determine if they are unique to pediatric bipolar disorder.</p>
dc.identifier.submissionpathpsych_pp/397
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry
dc.source.pages1256-65


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